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10 bolt front with D60 knuckles, inner axles and outer axles and D60 hubs

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 88K5Jimmy, Jan 21, 2003.

  1. 88K5Jimmy

    88K5Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    I read this in Oct 02 Four Wheeler and got to wondering how this was possible...

    "The front axle uses a two-piece housing to the left of the pumpkin that rotates inside of itself. The stock 10-bolt knuckles were removed and replaced with D60 front knuckles in order to utilize D60 inner axles, 35-spline outer axles and D60 hubs."

    My question is how did the D60 inner axles fit inside the 10-bolt housing? I thought the D60 inner axles were bigger than the 10-bolt inner axles so did he have to find replacement bearings that would fit inside the 10-bolt housing and accept the D60 inner axles? Also, I thought the spline counts were different between the D60 and 10-bolt where they go into the carrier?

    What do you guys think?
     
  2. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    My guess is that the inner axleshafts are machined down to fit the 10-bolt carrier, probably a later 30-spline version. I don't think you could really machine out the carrier to accept the larger shafts (1.31" vs. 1.50") though I can't guarantee that. However this shouldn't affect the size of the bearings. The outer knuckle conversion has been done before on both Toyota and Ford 9-inch axles and is not that hard if you have the machining and fab skills, and is basically done to accomodate the larger axle shaft ujoints and larger stub shafts.
     
  3. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> I think that someone spent alot of money to make a ring-gear-eating machine. /forums/images/graemlins/deal.gif </font color>
     
  4. txbartman

    txbartman 1/2 ton status

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    I guess I also really question the value of this. Where do many 10-bolt axleshafts break? Right at the splines. So, if you machine down a 60 shaft to the 10-bolt size, you are really risking breakage in the same place. Second, the new breakage point has probably just moved to the carrier or the R&amp;P, as was mentioned.

    Yeah a 10-bolt has much better ground clearance than a 60, but with a smaller u-joint on the pinion and considering the incredible expense someone went through to convert everything but the carrier, gears, and axle housing to a 60, if probably would have been cheaper to just get a 60 in the first place!
     
  5. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    First of all let me say that I wouldn't go to the trouble to do that type of conversion, but the following might be some reasons to do so:

    The stock inner 10-bolt shafts have a necked down V by the splines and usually where it would break. Getting rid of this and using the the larger 30-splines shafts would make a decent setup.

    The 297x size u-joint seems to be a pretty common weak spot on a 10-bolt or Dana 44 front, and the 19-spline outers are close behind also.

    All in all it's the same basic concept as putting chromoly axleshafts and CTM u-joints in.

    Also remember that the custom axle was under what I would presume to be a relatively light vehicle.
     
  6. 88K5Jimmy

    88K5Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    Yeah I don't think would be worth-while operation to undergo. I was just didn't know how this was possible. yeah the axle was under a an ole Willys flatfender, so there wasn't much weight to the vehicle.
     

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