Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

35" too big for a 10 bolt?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Pookster, Jul 19, 2002.

  1. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Posts:
    3,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC, NY, USA
    35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    So I now have an offer on my plate for 35's for a 6lug pattern. Hearing all the bad stuff about 10 bolts snapping and what not.. makes me just a tad bit worried. If I retain the 3.73 gears, will it be mild enough so that I reduce driveline stress? (Or is this not even a factor). I am generally pretty easy on the skinny pedal, and run mostly sand/mud and the occassional mild rock climb.

    Opinions? would also putting a lockright on the front cause excessive stress? The truck fortunately isn't a daily driver, I only use it to tow and carry large items.
     
  2. backyardbuilt

    backyardbuilt 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Posts:
    1,301
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Olathe, Kansas
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    If you play it right 10 bolts aren't as bad as you might think. my front has held up to 38.5 boggers. It is all about knowing when to let off and when not to. A locker will stress it alot more but it still comes down to the above statement. 35's is the limit 95% of people will tell you for 10 bolts I've seen mud only trucks run 44's with little breakage but the driver has been doing it for 20 years.
     
  3. kpanza

    kpanza 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2000
    Posts:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lake Forest, Orange County, California
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    Ditto what he said...I had 35s on my 10 bolts for 5+ years with no breakage...now, I will tell you that I am more of a "finesse" driver than a hammer down driver. It's all about driving smartly - if you do that you SHOULD be ok. I emphasize the SHOULD BE part, because you just never know...but if I had to do it all over again from the beginning, I would have no problems using a 10 bolt with 35s. Having said that, once I was able to afford the swap to 14b and D60, I did do it - mainly because my wheeling became more and more on the "harder core" side (that's a relative term to some guys on here!)

    But I would say go for it, you should be ok with them...just always remember that smarter driving is always cheaper!! /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  4. speed_deed

    speed_deed 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2001
    Posts:
    947
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Valley Center KS
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    10 bolts are just fine. Awhile back the FOUR WHEELER magazine had a tahoe with a 10 bolt running 44's. Dont worry about it, just dont drive stupid and 10 bolts will be just fine.
     
  5. SkulzNBonz

    SkulzNBonz 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2002
    Posts:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    OKC, Oklahoma
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    Yep, I'm goin' 35-36's, and I ain't skeered! Then again, my anemic 305 couldn't break traction on wet pavement with bald tires.

    John
     
  6. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Posts:
    3,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC, NY, USA
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    Ahh, thanks guys. I have an Eaton Posi on the rear, I hear that that replaces some of the more "breakable" parts on the 10b's. But for the front, I was thinking about a true trac. I guess its one of those balances in life; having a locker means I could get up those obstacles easier, and without having to mash the skinny pedal. Guess I will have to be more careful when trying to turn! (Could always just unlock one wheel.... )
     
  7. tomseviltwin

    tomseviltwin 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Posts:
    2,065
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    In my limited experience, I've only ever seen axles break when the driver was either: wedged in a hole, spinning tires and catching sudden traction, or bouncing the truck with heavy throttle while driving up a big obstacle. Easy does it rules the day and saves the parts.
     
  8. ChevyCaGal

    ChevyCaGal 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2000
    Posts:
    8,158
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA USA
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    10 bolts aren't that bad... I honestly would be going with my 10b front I bought except I decided to go and build a rock crawler.... and big meats, heavy weight and a 10 bolt is a bad combo, especially since I have a heavy foot... but if you are smart and don't go out to climb the Rubicon with a 10 bolt while gassing it you'll be fine! Crap when I was clueless (pre CK5 days) I did stupid stuff and never busted it... so maybe being clueless is the key to not break stuff! /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  9. Diesel Dan

    Diesel Dan 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Posts:
    798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Warren, Ohio
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    We only played in the mud, but as luck had it I never broke my 10 bolt front. Ran fairly bald 36x12.50 TSLs on the front and new 35x16 boggers on the rear with a 14bolt in that truck. All others had D60s.
    Now my brother in-law had new radial TSL 26x12.50s with a milder tread than the bias ply and his D44 broke the carrier in two. I actually think we had more D44 failures in the front than 10 bolts.
     
  10. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2001
    Posts:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Clearfield Ut.
    Re: 35\" too big for a 10 bolt?

    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    I have an Eaton Posi on the rear

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Are you talking about the ol' G.M."Gov-loc"? The factory locker. (it goes by several other names)

    If so, I would take it really easy on the skinny pedal.
    That style of locker requires a tire to slip and spin to activate the locking mechanism and it often engages with a "bang" that can be tuff on parts.

    Like everyone else has said here, taking it easy can help. Allthough, the larger than stock tires will increase the chance of breaking something - no matter how "easy" you are on it.
     

Share This Page