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350 engine rebuild

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by eshorvath, Jul 10, 2002.

  1. eshorvath

    eshorvath 1/2 ton status

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    Where can I find a reasonably priced engine rebuild kit for a 350 that I want to put into my K-5?
    Ed
     
  2. JohnnyFresno

    JohnnyFresno 1/2 ton status

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    http://www.naparts.com

    Heard a lot of great things about them.

    Base Master kit is $154.99 or so. With upgrades comes out to like $250 still worth it in my opinion. I will be purchasing this kit as soon as I get a new daily driver.

    Hope this helps good luck.

    Johnny
     
  3. TXsizeK5

    TXsizeK5 1/2 ton status

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  4. BlazingItaly

    BlazingItaly Registered Member

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    They have a kit for 154.99 bucks upgradeble
     
  5. BlazingItaly

    BlazingItaly Registered Member

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  6. JohnnyFresno

    JohnnyFresno 1/2 ton status

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    I guess someone didnt bother to read all the threads /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif
     
  7. Blazer_Boy

    Blazer_Boy 1/2 ton status

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    I have that kit, heck I live right next to Northern. Whatever you do PLEASE don't get the hypereutectic pistons. Cast pistons will do nicely for almost any application you can make. If you're gonna turn 7,000, then go forged. I don't feel very comfortable when performance companies put this on their site.

    Hypereutectic pistons are not some recent "breakthrough" as the sales people would have you believe. Cast and hypereutectic pistons are made using a molten mixture and a mold. Hypereutectic pistons essentially just have more sand added to the mixutre. Actually its, silicon, but sand sounds funnier because its primarily silicon. With mixture over loaded with silicon it pours a little nicer and there are less rejects. A good incentive for the manufacturers because that means more to sell. With this super hard piston, comes a super brittle pistons. They love to rip off below the wrist piston. The machine shop where I had my motor bored has a crapped out hyper piston on the wall just to illustrate that point.

    You ever wonder why they always say don't weld a frame? Thats right, it will become brittle. Similar to taking something hot and dropping it in water. Its forged all right, and brittle as hell. Thats where tempering comes in. They take that material and heat it back up again, but not as hot, and let it cool. Now you've some of the hardness of a forged piece with some of the give it had before all this. I guess thats more FYI, but a similar illustration as to what happens when something is made to be super hard.

    Now I supposed I'll get flammed by those who've bought these. Oh well, just trying to help you from choosing the incorret part.
     
  8. BlazingItaly

    BlazingItaly Registered Member

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    Sorry guys and gals,
    I was sleeping, didn't realize that.
     
  9. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Not to argue just to argue, but I think that illustration you gave is the reason shops don't warranty engines for the most part. Detonation is NOT the pistons fault, and the owner got what they deserved. More than likely someone at that company was recommending hyper. pistons to everyone and then realized they were wrong.

    AFAIK almost ALL new engines from all major manufacturers use hypereutectics (except I'm sure in things like diesels) because hypereutectics are lighter and expand less. A few less grams reduces reciprocating weight by hundreds of pounds, and thus, you get longer engine life, and more power. (ability to run tighter clearances and less mass to turn) None of these are bad things, and if most powertrains are coming with at least a 30,000 mile warranty, the manufacturers must be fairly confident in them.

    If they were that bad, no one would use them, and thats not the case. If they were so horrid, there would be lawsuits right and left, and there are not. They are not right for every application, nor are cast, nor are forged. In any case, I can't find it now, but I was going to show that TRW has a chart somewhere online showing that forged pistons are the ideal material for every truck engine, (light truck) and IMHO, that is simply not true, and never will be. But yet thats a *manufacturer* stating this. And thats what I'm sure happens with most failures of hypereutectics...being used when they shouldn't be, probably recommended to people that should be using something different.

    You have a point about the "brittleness" of the alloy, and that is correct. Hyper. pistons are NOT forgiving. but if you don't do stupid things with them, stupid things won't happen. I had a motor with a hole in a cast piston...that doesn't mean that cast pistons suck in all cases.

    So just because someone blew up a hypereutectic piston doesn't mean they are all bad. Cast pistons are destroyed all the time too, by idiots using huge shots of nitrous on them, or revving the heck out of them, boosting them, whatever. Hyper. pistons were not designed for that type of abuse, and an improperly operating engine (detonating) is no excuse for some company or individual to claim they are faulty.

    Now, when (and if) I ever get my motor pieces back from the engine shop and get it assembled, I will be right back on here the day that one of the hypereutectic pistons comes apart. It will be 9.5:1, and I have *no* qualms about running them whatsoever. I just know that I probably shouldn't expect to turbo the motor and run 15lbs of boost, nor rev it to 8000RPM's every day.
     

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