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42 deg. non-cv driveshaft?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by ChadH82, Oct 2, 2001.

  1. ChadH82

    ChadH82 1/2 ton status

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    I went to a local shop a few days ago and noticed they had a display of a driveshaft. I asked the guy what it was and he said it was a driveshaft they developed to run up to 42 degrees with no CV. My question is would this thing run okay at that much of an angle at higher speeds (45-55)? Seems to me that you would get a lot of vibration from it and the u-joints would have to be replaced every other day. What do you guys think?
     
  2. ChadH82

    ChadH82 1/2 ton status

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    No one care or is that just a stupid post?

    Chad
     
  3. michaelm

    michaelm 1/2 ton status

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    ever read why it is bad to run high misalignment on a ujoint?
    42 would be brutal accelleration and decelleration every revolution, otherwords harmonics would destroy it even if it didnt physically hit itself at 42 deg.
    I lack the vocabulary to discuss that
    the idea is touched on <a target="_blank" href=http://www.outdoorwire.com/content/4x4/toyota/tech/driveline/>here</a>
    i have seen a better article online somewhere but the 2 min search didnt come up with it.
     
  4. thatK30guy

    thatK30guy 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Chad, its not a stupid post nor a stupid question.

    I think you are asking a question that has many of us stumped! [​IMG]

    I would say for you to ask Jesse at High Angle Driveline about this. He's the man who is building all those driveshafts to work at damn near impossible angles. [​IMG]

    His username is drivelineman. His site is <a target="_blank" href=http://highangledriveline.com>highangledriveline.com</a>.

    <font color=red>I'm a "black top mudder"!!!</font color=red>

    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/thatK30guy>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/thatK30guy</a>
     
  5. RedDwarf

    RedDwarf 1/2 ton status

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    The higher of an angle you run the less hours of use the joint will have.

    Like 77Chev said, the joint accelerates, then decelerates, then accelerates in the opposite direction.
    The higher the operating angle, the faster it must accelerate, because it has to travel a longer distance in the same period of time. At low speeds, this acceleration is lessened.
    Therefore, at highway speeds, the joint is going to fail sooner, plain and simple.

    I can't give you a number, but I think everyone will agree, they will fail quickly.


    Still Poundin' "pavment" after all these years!!! [​IMG]
     
  6. drivelineman

    drivelineman 1/2 ton status

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    true the higher the angle the less life expectancy- we usually run higher angle shafts up front becuase they do not turn all the time and you don't have to worry about vibrations unless you are locked in going faster speeds- but the 42 degree shaft is a toyota shaft and is damn strong and is designed for the rockcrawler mainly for max flex- hope this helps- Jess

    Owner of High Angle Driveline http://highangledriveline.com
     
  7. ChadH82

    ChadH82 1/2 ton status

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    Alright, thanks for all the replies guys.

    Chad
     
  8. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

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    77chev's link to the driveline geometry article states that a CV-less driveline should keep the output shaft and the pinion angle parallel to each other. I have a cv-less driveline but my pinion angle is lined up straight with the driveshaft. Should I be concerned about this, it was like this when I bought it and has no spacers or re-welded perches with the 4" lift?

    ! After sending this post, I walked out to my truck to inspect the angles. While the rear pinion is pointed up, it is slightly bent down from being straight with the driveline and with the tailshaft of the transfer cast also sagged down a bit, the two are nearly parallel to each other, with a little more angle at the tailshaft. I think I understand what the article was saying now and I'm not AS worried. Explains a bit of the remaining vibration with the new u-joints as well. Should I angle the pinion down a bit more to make it parallel with the tailshaft. Additionally, my front drive shaft IS a cv type shaft and the front pinion is not straight with the front driveline, should I shim this to correct or reweld the perches?<P ID="edit"><FONT class="small">Edited by BorregoK5 on 10/03/01 12:04 PM.</FONT></P>
     
  9. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I wouldn't reweld the front perches (really hard to do on a D60 because the perch is integrated with the pumpkin). By rewelding the perches it changes the caster (or is it camber), but anyways the best way to do the front (although a major PITA) is by rotating the pumpkin in relation to the axle tubes. The pumpkin is rotated for better driveline angle, while the tubes, perches, and knuckles remain in their "stock" location to keep steering geometry within proper specs. You can do many things, such as rotating just the knuckles and rewelding the spring perches, but in the end the "best" way is to rotate the pumpkin.
    Again this is what I have been told, if I am wrong please correct me.

    See my rig at <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Leadfoot>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Leadfoot</a>
     

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