Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

465/205 adapter mount problems

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Langosta39, Feb 26, 2003.

  1. Langosta39

    Langosta39 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Posts:
    156
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    So I'm installing my transfer case crossmember-to-adatper bolts and I get them to about 5 ft/lbs and they strip. Well crap! I'm thinking about drilling the adapter holes all the way through then grinding the top flat to accomodate a bolt and nut setup. Anyone think this is a bad idea, or anyone done this before? I assume the adapter is cast iron, correct me if I'm wrong, so it could handle missing a bit of extra metal. On a side note, is cast iron hard to drill or grind? I don't know my materials very well.

    later,
    andy
     
  2. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2000
    Posts:
    26,978
    Likes Received:
    189
    Location:
    Roy WA
    Yes the adapter is cast iron.

    No, I don't know if the nut/bolt idea will work, but I do know the adapters are real weak (comparatively) in the threaded section there. If you did the nut/bolt idea, I'd imagine the top surface would have to be flat, which it's not as I recall. If its not flat, you won't get even clamping pressure, and stress the already weak area more.

    You could use threadserts.

    I did approx 20 1/2" holes through cast iron GM heads with one carbide bit, and a drill press, it was a piece of cake. Bit cost about $20, but it worked.
     
  3. mountainexplorer

    mountainexplorer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2001
    Posts:
    4,903
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Spokane, Wa./Ione, Wa
    Whwn I got the "truck blazer", it had one bolt all the way through one side of the adapter with a nut on the top. I think they just got a longer bolt, threaded it all the way up, and tightened down a nut up top. It's never came loose on me, and I've never had to mess with it myself.
     
  4. Langosta39

    Langosta39 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Posts:
    156
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    What exactally are threadserts? If I have to drill the adapter for those I might as well drill all the way through a use a bolt/nut so I don't have anymore probs. You said the adapters are weak in this area, do you think it would hurt its integrity by drilling and grinding?

    andy
     
  5. 79Beast

    79Beast 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    Posts:
    1,155
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Georgia
    Just do what you said you were gonna do. Drill the hole out to 1/2", grind the top flat, and put a gr.5 or 8 bolt in it. I have been running like this for years and it is not the weak area. Cast is easier to drill and grind than mild steel. It grinds very quickly.
     
  6. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2002
    Posts:
    15,160
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    [ QUOTE ]
    So I'm installing my transfer case crossmember-to-adatper bolts and I get them to about 5 ft/lbs and they strip. Well crap! I'm thinking about drilling the adapter holes all the way through then grinding the top flat to accomodate a bolt and nut setup. Anyone think this is a bad idea, or anyone done this before? I assume the adapter is cast iron, correct me if I'm wrong, so it could handle missing a bit of extra metal. On a side note, is cast iron hard to drill or grind? I don't know my materials very well.

    later,
    andy

    [/ QUOTE ]

    That's exactly what happened to me and exactly what I did, and it works.
    You don't have to drill or tap, it's threaded all the way or at least mine was, I just milled the top flat and put a nut on it. Between the stripped threads and the nut on top it held to gether just fine.
    Another weaknes I have seen is the outer part breaking off from side loads.
    It's cast so it's brittle and it can break that way.
    I was thinking the other day just to make sure this doesn't hapen to me, I would make a strap and go around from side to side to keep it together using a steel strap.
     
  7. Langosta39

    Langosta39 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Posts:
    156
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    You mean using some plumbers tape or something thicker to go over the adapter to hold it down from twisting?

    seems like it could work, i actually had a similar idea but didnt know if it was a good one.

    andy
     
  8. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2002
    Posts:
    15,160
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    [ QUOTE ]
    You mean using some plumbers tape or something thicker to go over the adapter to hold it down from twisting?

    seems like it could work, i actually had a similar idea but didnt know if it was a good one.

    andy

    [/ QUOTE ]

    NO
    You know how the bottom has like 2 legs each with a bolt through it?
    Well the sides sometimes chip of, and welding them isn't an easy option so to protect them before they break, wrap a steel strap, like what they use to strap crates but a little thicker and wider like 2" wide, that will reinforce it.
    I will have a pic soon once I make it.
    /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  9. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2000
    Posts:
    26,978
    Likes Received:
    189
    Location:
    Roy WA
    Threadserts are basically the same idea as heli-coils, except use standard taps.

    If everyone else is just using a nut/bolt arrangement (with the top milled flat) do that.

    Regardless, the bolt holes *are* a weak area, my first adapter was broken right there, and I'm not the only one here that has had the same problem.
     

Share This Page