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4x4 lingo post

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by amm888, Apr 25, 2003.

  1. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    just read a post about "whats a doubler" (which i didn't know, and now half-know) and thought it would be cool if we had a '4x4 for dummies' type of post with basic explanations of all the lingo (spline, tbi, HEI, all those gear #s, engine ...etc) for people like me who are new to this and don't have the lingo down yet (and are too lazy to try and find out via search? - no, actually it's often hard to find a simple explanation, or even any explanation)

    just an idea... /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif
     
  2. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Sure, let's knock down some topics right now. I'll start by saying I'm going to assume you have a VERY basic understanding of these things - therefore the "elementary" explanations.
    [ QUOTE ]
    whats a doubler

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I'm sure I could give you an explanation of this, but I'll leave it to someone who has done it and knows all of the particulars.
    [ QUOTE ]
    spline

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Spline is the groves cut in say an axleshaft or the output shaft of the transfer case. It provides a means for torque to be transferred into the shaft. The part that it goes into of course is splined as well. Here's a pic of the splines on a "stub shaft" - that would be the outer axle-shaft on a front axle: [​IMG]
    [ QUOTE ]
    tbi

    [/ QUOTE ]
    TBI stands for throttle body injection. It's the fuel injection system found on GM gas truck engines from '87-present. Different style after '95, but it's still throttle body injection. It's basically a carb with injectors mounted atop it which shoot the fuel down the bores. I'm sure I'll upset some carb guys by explaining it like that, but it's the easiest way to explain it. Unlike carbs, fuel injected engines take an electrical fuel pump mounted in the gas tank as opposed to the mechanical fuel pump mounted on the engine block.
    [ QUOTE ]
    HEI

    [/ QUOTE ]
    HEI is GM's High Energy Ignition. It replaces the points style ignition. It's truly a wonderful thing. Normally with the old points system for distributers (which I should add is a very old, tried, and true system) you would need to replace points all of the time. Now, the engines are equipped with HEI. There are two basic stlyes of the HEI, but both are practically the same. On one, the HEI module is mounted atop the distributor cap, the other has the HEI module mounted off of the cap on the intake manifold.
    [ QUOTE ]
    all those gear #s

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Well, I think you're talking about axle ratios. First of all, a differential takes an input force and turns it 90 degrees to each side. In the differential, there are gears. There is a pinion and a ring gear. On the ring gear there are a certain number of teeth. Likewise on the ring gear. The ratios you hear about are the number of teeth on the ring gear, divided by the teeth on the pinion. If you have "low" gears...that gear ratio is actually numerically higher. What happens in a differential geared to 4.10:1, is that for every 4.1 turns of the driveshaft, the tires will complete one revolution. You'll find most people on here talking about switching from 3.42's to 4.10's for example. This is to make up for an increase in tire size.
    [ QUOTE ]
    engine

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Holy man, I just read a 144 page book on engines - don't think I'll be repeating it all for you...sorry. If you've got specific questions, just ask. In these trucks and years, you'll find 5.0L 305s, 5.7L 350s, 400s, and 6.2L diesels. Both of those numbers (the Liters, and the cubic inches) describe how much volume is in all of the cylinders combined. It's found by using: Pi((1/2)bore)^2 x stroke x number of cylinders.

    Ok, I think that took care of some stuff. Anybody feel free to correct me or add-to if you feel the need.

    Just hang out on here long enough and you'll pick up on all of this stuff. Don't skip over the posts that you don't know much about...you won't learn anything that way.

    /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif THAT WAS LONG. /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
     
  3. BranndonC

    BranndonC 3/4 ton status

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  4. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    heavy - thanks for all the info (i'll pm you as soon as i come across another term i don't understand /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif) btw, i was just kidding about the engine /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

    Branndon - cool link, and i like the link on the link...
     
  5. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    welded rear differential? /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif (any takers?) /forums/images/graemlins/ears.gif
     
  6. chevyfumes

    chevyfumes Court jester

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    Watch for the muzzleflash!
    [ QUOTE ]
    Just hang out on here long enough and you'll pick up on all of this stuff. Don't skip over the posts that you don't know much about...you won't learn anything that way.

    [/ QUOTE ] /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gifditto....
     
  7. Confedneck

    Confedneck 3/4 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    spline

    [/ QUOTE ]
    - that would be the outer axle-shaft on a front axle: [​IMG]
    insert "broken" in there somewhere, lol
     
  8. chevyfumes

    chevyfumes Court jester

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    Watch for the muzzleflash!
    ORD doubler.... This should keep you busy for awhile..... /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  9. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    "welded rear dif"
    this one you havbe to start out looking up what an open rear differential is, then think welding it solid to turn it into a spool removing the 'differential' part LOL
     
  10. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    welded rear differential?

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Inside the differential, there are spider gears. These gears, when welded into a solid mass make the "cheap man's locker" or the "lincoln locker" - (Lincoln being the name of a welder).
    Search for the name KidJethro and look at his recent posts. He made one about how to weld up the 14 bolt properly.
    Basically a welded rear is just like a spool. Both of the wheels will turn at the same speed, all the time. This makes it undesireable for trucks that see a lot of street driving because when going around a turn, the inside wheel and outside wheel are forced to travel the same speed - which they don't normally.
     
  11. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    cv shaft /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  12. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    CV stands for Constant Velocity.

    I think a lot of people use this name incorrectly. A CV shaft is what you'll find in the front of the newer chevys with Independent Front Suspensions and other front wheel drive cars.
    What most people mean when they say CV shaft is double-cardan joint. It's basically two u-joints on one end of the shaft - connected with a coupler. They pretty much allow for increased angles of operation without vibrations that would normally be felt with a standard drive shaft.
    At least that's my understanding of the difference. You can pretty much interchange both terms and people will know what you're talking about. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong or you think otherwise, please.
    [​IMG]
    Thanks backyardbuilt for the un-consented use of your pic. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  13. Goober

    Goober 1/2 ton status

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    CV Joint=Constant Velocity Joint



    <font color="orange"> heavy4x4 </font> gave a great description but let me give you some boring history of u-joints.


    The Universal Joint was developed in the 1500's by an Italian mathematician named Girolamo Cardano (Jerome Cardan). In the 1600's a guy named Robert Hooke designed a cross type universal joint based on Cardan's design. Finally, in 1902, Clarence Spicer (founder of Spicer Universal Joint Manufacturing Company) modified the designs of Cardan and Hooke to come up with a joint that could transmit power through a driveshaft to turn an automobiles back wheels.

    A u-joint allows a rotating shaft to transmit power through a varying angle. Since this rotation is transmitted through an angle, the velocity of the shaft does not stay constant. If you imagine the u-joint as it operates, you will see that it does not travel in a circle (like the shaft) as it rotates, it travels in an ellipse. This change in torsional velocity induces a rotational speed differential that can be felt as a vibration. If your driveline angles are small enough, this vibration is minimal and will not be felt. If your your driveline angles are too large (after you install your 8" springs) then you will feel a vibration as the shaft turns.

    To eliminate this vibration you can either reduce the angle of the joint or you can put a "double Cardan" CV joint in there. With two of these "Cardan" style joints mounted together (look at heavy4x4's picture) the vibrations from each joint will cancel each other out.



    Does that make it clearer, or was that more information than you wanted?



    If you need to have a CV shaft made for your truck, go to High Angle Driveline and get a ColoradoK5 discount.
     
  14. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    awesome info guys /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    i've got a double Cardan (looks like a skinny version of the thing in heavy's pic) as the front drive line on my truck
     
  15. Swanson52

    Swanson52 1/2 ton status

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    PO-Previous Owner
    DD-Daily Driver
    WMS-Wheel Mounting Surface (as in WMS to WMS measurement on an axle)
    There are 3 that you will likely encounter, not sure if you knew, but thought I would throw em out there.
     
  16. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    D60 : Dana 60 (usually front)
    C14 : Corporate 14 bolt axle (also C10 and C12 for 1/2 ton axles)
    C14FF: Heavy duty 14 bolt corp axle where there are hubs with bearing that support the weight. The axle *only* makes it turn...
    Semi-Float Axle : The axle turns the tire and bears the weight, but, there is a bearing pressed on (or otherwise retained at) the out-board end of the axle. If the axle breaks in-board of the bearing, the tire stays on (for a while anyway) and you can still drive.
    C-Clip axles : axle shaft turns the tire AND carries all the weight. Axle shaft is retained by a "C" clip inside the diff. Break an axle and the tire will not stay on the vehicle (without rigging some sort of retainer)
     
  17. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    sway bar

    axle truss
     
  18. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Sway bar: [​IMG]
    The tubular thing you see pinned to that newly installed "sway-bar disconnect" is the sway bar. It's attached to the spring plate on both sides of the axle and also to the frame. Its purpose is to prevent body roll in turns. The reason why some people install "sway bar disconnects" (sold by ORD ) is because a sway bar severly limits how much the axle can drop and compress - which is a bad thing when you're offroading. After installing a lift (and thus stiffer springs), some people just ditch the swaybar entirely and don't notice much on-road handling difference.

    Axle truss: [​IMG]
    That extra piece of metal added underneath the housing is put there to add rigidity to the axle housing. Aftermarket axle-trusses usually bolts on to the axle tube with u-bolts, but in extreme cases (like baja racing) the axle trusses are welded to the housing. Truses aren't really necessary unless you like to get your truck airborn /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif.
     
  19. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    how do you do that so fast /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    does removing the swaybar improve on-road performance at all (softer ride?). since i've got a 6" lift could it be worth trying?
     
  20. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    If you've got a 6" lift...try it. Un-bolt the two ends from the spring plates and tie it up against the frame for the time being with a cable tie or something (this may be less easy than it sounds if the bushings are old and don't want to let the swaybar rotate - in that case just loosen those attaching points or remove them). It's all about personal preference. Some people don't notice a difference, or if there is a difference, it's not big enough to worry about. Others don't like the excessive roll around corners or changing lanes.

    As far as softening the ride...not really. I could go into the geometry of how the system is setup (angles and how the spring acts as it compresses), but there most likely won't be much difference.

    Try it, that'd be the best thing to do.
     

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