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6" lift on a 72

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by crithke, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. crithke

    crithke Registered Member

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    I'm getting around to finally being able to afford a lift for my 72, and was thinking about a 6" lift. The K5 has a 350/NP205/Turbo 375 with stock axles/gearing. I'm not going to be doing much serious wheeling, just a little mud now and again, so rubbing while flexing isn't really an issue. I was thinking about 35x12.50x15 BFG MTs on 15x10 wheels. Will this fit without rubbing on an onroad truck? Can I go any bigger on the tire size (again, without rubbing)? I absolutely love the lines on the 72 and I am not going to take the sawzall to it. Also, money is an issue on this project. Will going with blocks in the rear be a horrible idea? How bad would the ride be? It's already pretty horrible, lol. My final question is, on a 6" lift, would I have to do anything like change brake lines/pittman arm/change driveline angle/lower transfercase or swaybar?

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. crithke

    crithke Registered Member

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    anyone
     
  3. blazinzuk

    blazinzuk Buzzbox voodoo Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    I know guys that ran a 6" with 36s on a 72 blazer and a 69 pickup no rubbing. You will need extended brake lines some sort of steering correction, you also may need to extend you drivelines. I didn't even know those early trucks had swaybars, but if they do for it to work best you will need some sort of extension. As far as the rear goes blocks would probably be fine. Also you might consider a shackle flip and a 2" lift spring for the 6". If you can't afford to mess around with the rear right now just do the block, you can always change it later. I don't know about 1st gen springs but do some research and get the softest rate ones you can find. Good luck with this There are a bunch of first gen guys in another forum on here you may try there to get a more exact response
     
  4. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Do you have a lift on the truck currently?

    A stock suspension should ride pretty well. If it's a typical 4" lift (aka Rough Country) that might explain the rough ride.

    Like most questions about tire clearance, the answer is always "it depends"...4" lift can work with 35's for some people. Others need 6" of lift for the same 35's if they wheel it a little harder and flex it a little more.

    One thing that is certain. If you lift the truck with 6" suspension lift, you will need to deal with EVERYTHING in your list (steering, brake lines, driveshafts, etc)

    A combo where you mixed a 1" (or 2") body lift with a 4" spring and maybe some 1" zero-rates you will be a lot more likely to avoid other problems. Steering will need attention no matter what.

    Lift blocks in the rear won't change the spring rate (so the ride will be no worse than it already is) but they will encourage axle-wrap. A better solution would be a 4" shackleflip and a set of stock late model K5 springs (look for '87 and up timeframe which should have the teflon slides)....they are quite a bit softer than stock 1st Gen springs and you can probably get them for free if you look around.
     
  5. crithke

    crithke Registered Member

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    I appreciate the help guys. Just a couple more questions for clarification on some things I don't totally understand.

    1) I think I understand the shackle flip concept but not entirely (been reading up, heh). If I mixed 4" shackle flips with a 2" body lift would I achieve the same 6" when the ride is standing (aka not flexing)? Allowing me to fit 35s?

    2) Bit of confusion, are shackle flips used on just the rear or both ends? If only in the rear, how would you recommend raising the front?

    3) Lastly, If I were to go with the plan outlined in #1, would I have to worry about any additional changes besides steering? And, if so, what are your recommendations on correcting the steering?

    Is this a feasible option for a lift? Keep in mind I'm not doing any serious wheeling in this truck (can't afford to tear it up), just a little mud now and again. Also, could someone tell me what axle-wrap is?

    Thanks for your help guys
     
  6. blazinzuk

    blazinzuk Buzzbox voodoo Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    A shackle flip is exactly what it says it is only for the rear it takes the end of the shackle that the leaf spring is attached to and points it down, not up like the stock one. yes the shackle flip in the rear with a 4" lift up front and a 2" body lift would make for about 6" of lift I would lift the front using new lifted leaf springs. Even with a 4" lift you may find that you need driveshaft work, there is no hard and fast rule as far as that goes.
    Axle wrap is the torque of the engine being transfered into the springs. As you accelerate your diff is using a rotational force to turn the tires. Some of this rotation can be seen in the suspension. It caused the springs to go into somewhat of an S shape. Robbing you of available power and eventually ruining leaf springs. Blocks act as a lever that makes this worse. With the shackle flip for most poeple it is mostly a non issue Hope this helps
     

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