Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

700R4 rebuild

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by seslick77, Mar 7, 2002.

  1. seslick77

    seslick77 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2002
    Posts:
    220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Been readin alot about the 1st year of the 700R4 bein crummy. How hard would it be to rebuild this thing myself? Any tips as to what mods to do to beef it up, what kit to use etc.? Also what Torque conv. stall should I use behind a 400sb?? Help is allways appreciated:) Sam
     
  2. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2000
    Posts:
    9,075
    Likes Received:
    486
    Location:
    Grand Rapids area
    I did it myself. It took about 4 long days. 1 each to get it in and out of the vehicle. about 1 for the teardown and 1 for the rebuild. Of course there was some extra time in there for getting new parts and such. It saved me about $700 and I got to make everything the way I wanted. That was a year and a half ago and I am about to tear into it again. Everything wasn't perfect to begin with, I had to do a few mods to get all the shifts right because I modified everything with a B&M super transkit. Fortunately, none of that stuff required pulling the tranny back out. If it was just a stock rebuild, it would be a lot more straight forward. I had to go back and forth between two manuals and pick and choose instructions based on what I thought would be best. In one part, it didn't go together right and I had to deviate from all of the instructions and do my own thing and modify the 3-4 clutch apply plate based on how it looked like it should go together.

    There are tons of special tools required. If you bought them all, the cost would be the same as just driving the truck to a shop for the rebuild. Many of them you can get by without, many you can not. I borrowed a few and fabricated a few and found ways to substitute for a few.

    The job requires meticulous attention to detail and organization. There are something like 400 pieces in there and every one has to go back in exactly the same order.

    My advice is to buy the Chilton's manual for GM auto trannies, read through it and then decide if it's something you want to tackle. The way I approached it was that worst case, if I couldn't get it back together right, I could always use it as a core and buy a rebuild from a local shop. Also, find a local shop that will sell you small parts so that you can replace any little stuff that is questionable along the way.
     
  3. Kyle89K5

    Kyle89K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    2,273
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    OKLAHOMA
    Well, I tore mine down to rebuild it, didn't think it would be too tough, but I admitted defeat after a while. I fabricated some of the tools I needed, but they didn't work quit right. I gound a shop in town that is finishing it off for me for a song. All told, I'll have about $500 in the rebuild. Strength wise it will be a little better than a JET. The tools were gonna cost me more than paying this guy to put it back together, so it was kinda a no brainer. I'm also getting a warranty.

    I'm not saying don't do it yourself, but in my case, I didn't have the time or tools to finish it. I ended up breaking a finger in the middle of all this so that changed my perception as well. I'm going to start sending as much business as I can to the shop that did mine. His price kicked the crap out of anyone else and the product rocks. Folks that are going to the midwest run will get to see first hand the work this guy does. OUTSTANDING tranny. He's got one living behind a 600 horse smallblock right now, that's gotta say something /forums/images/icons/smile.gif

    Good luck. BTW, the HAYNES Manual REALLY rocks for picture by picture tear down of the thing.
     
  4. seslick77

    seslick77 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2002
    Posts:
    220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Hmmm.....Sounds like buyin a rebuild would be easier and cheaper in the long run. I know I don't have the proper tools!! I was just curious cause I have the engine out and I figure why not freshen up the whole drivetrain while the trucks in pieces? I'll probly just wait till its broke before I decide to fix it lol!

    Still wondering what Torque converter to use though. I'm pretty sure the stock diesel is way too low of a stall. Thanx Sam
     
  5. seslick77

    seslick77 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2002
    Posts:
    220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Oh I allmost forgot, whats the difference between lock-up and non-lock-up tranys? What the heck do I have?
     
  6. Kyle89K5

    Kyle89K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    2,273
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    OKLAHOMA
    I'm putting a 1300 rpm stall back in mine. I'm kinda playing with it to see if it's what I want or not. If you give me till the first of next week, I can tell exactly how I feel about the TC.

    The choice is yours on rebuilding. I don't like ANYONE to work on my truck but me, BUT this and wiring are a little bit different animals to me /forums/images/icons/smile.gif Place local to me sells all the cool little hop up parts for change, plus the guy that's putting it all back together is cutting me some good deals, but I deff. trust him with my tranny. There were only two real tools that you MUST have to make it work. The spring compressor and the seal intall tool. Both of those around here would cost me ~$300 and for this guy to slap it back together was cheaper than that, not counting parts.
     
  7. Jay73K20

    Jay73K20 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Posts:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Se Slick;
    The lockup converter has a friction plate inside of the converter, which is activated by a solenoid kind of like a manual clutch. When it locks up there is no slip through the torque converter which lowers your rpm at cruise speed about ten percent.
     

Share This Page