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7MM mag, .270 or 30-06 ?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by got_mud, Jul 2, 2003.

  1. got_mud

    got_mud 1/2 ton status

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    well.... which caliber and why? leaning towards the savage 110 line up for $$$ reasons, opinions?

    the answers you need: lightweight deer mostly, elk in about two years, random varmints in the off season.

    i don't do my own reloading, so that is a factor. budget is like everything else we discuss here, i don't really need it, so sneaking it in under the radar will help to delay the inevitable.
     
  2. 77Jimmy

    77Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    Both my Dad and I hunt elk in CO yearly, and occassionally deer here in Georgia or Alabama and we both use the 7MM mag b/c it's a very flat shooting bullet (actually, it may be the flatest but not 100% sure). If you're going to be hunting a LOT more deer than elk then the 7mm may be a bit much, but if you anticipate hunting both regularly the 7mm can do double duty for you...won't have to buy 2 guns w/ 2 different calibers. Small varmits...7mm is overkill. My Dad took a good sized cow elk last fall w/ his 7mm mag and the elk took a few big bounds down the hill and we found it laying in a creek about 20 yards from where he shot it about 10 minutes later...long way of saying the 7mm can do the job on elk. Some guys like more knock down power for elk, but for deer and/or elk I think a 7mm mag is the way to go.

    I think a box of 7mm mag (not 7mm ultra mag) is around $30...but my Dad has been finding Remington 7mm mag at Dick's Sporting Goods for $24...we thinking their computers must be screwed up or something to be selling it at that price but we're not saying anything! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    I hear you on the budget thing, but ammo is pretty cheap these days and I'd rather spending time at the range sighting in and practicing than reloading. Plus there's a mass production/consistency factor to consider...they make a ton of this stuff, over and over again, same grains, calibers, etc...one bullet is identical to the next.

    Probably more than you were looking for...hope it helped. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  3. Bhintz

    Bhintz 1/2 ton status

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    I would either do the .270 or 7mm
    7mm is a little over kill for deer but good for elk and would blow apart varmits
     
  4. 70~K5

    70~K5 1/2 ton status

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    With a '06 you can plink with the cheap surplus ammo. And you can find '06 ammo in any store that sells ammo, even some little country store.
     
  5. 77Jimmy

    77Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    That's a good point...30-06 has been around forever and ammo can be found anywhere and everywhere. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. MTBLAZER89

    MTBLAZER89 3/4 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    They are all very similar cartridges. It is a toss up here. I have shot elk with an 06 and 7mm. The 7mm is a little flatter shooting, but the 06 packs a little more punch. As far as $$$ besides the surplus ammo all of these guns should cost the same to shoot. It doesn't start getting worse till you get around .300 Win Mag.

    There also lots of wildcat calibers out now such as the 7MM STW <---Badass 7mm bullet in an 8mm case=fast /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    Here is a balistics page to compare them.
     
  7. 70~K5

    70~K5 1/2 ton status

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    Cheap practise is good. Sitting at a bench isn't what you'll do while hunting. Standing at the ready position and doing 100 yard snap shots is what you need for when you jump a deer while walking through the woods. You won't have preety little groups that way, but you should be able to hit a 6" circle by bringing the rifle to your shoulder and squeising a shot off.
     
  8. mudhog

    mudhog THEGAME Staff Member Super Moderator

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    i use a 7mm mag but thats just for bear i archery hunt for deer and elk /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  9. 77Jimmy

    77Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    Yep, I agree, a 6in circle is what you need to hit consistently. I like to practice hitting clay pigeons at 200 yards...if I can hit those then I'm good to go. Not an easy thing though hitting that 6 inch circle by any means when the big 6x6 (dreaming...someday though) steps out and your heart is thumping out of your chest! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif I always try to find a rest of some sort, a tree, a branch, a rock, wherever I'm going to set up for the ambush. I figure I need all the help I can get so I like to shoot a flatter bullet, don't want to be doing a lot of calculations in my head if a elk/deer jumps out at 200+ yards.

    Oh, and I forgot to say...when I say practice, I mean half a box max...after 6 shots w/ the high caliber stuff the shoulder starts hurting! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  10. Chevit

    Chevit 1/2 ton status

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    I'd go with the 7mm it is a little over kill as far as deer go but with a well placed shot that should not be a propblem, but you will be glad you have it for the knock down when it comes to elk... /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    BTW thats what I have... /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  11. 70~K5

    70~K5 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]

    Oh, and I forgot to say...when I say practice, I mean half a box max...after 6 shots w/ the high caliber stuff the shoulder starts hurting! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Then you don't want to shoot "highpower" bullseye matchs. 60 rounds of '06 from a garand steel buttplate and all.
     
  12. Don

    Don 1/2 ton status

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    I have a .270 shoot's flat, and is fairly fast. I've taken Deer, Elk, with this gun I really like it! Ruger M77 in .270 Winchester. With a 4x9 scope. /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
     
  13. MTBLAZER89

    MTBLAZER89 3/4 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    7mm overkill? /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif Damn I use a 300 Win Mag....makes a big hole /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif gotta place that shot right, but they never run away /forums/images/graemlins/deal.gif I guess it also depends on where you live..deer in MT can get pretty big
     
  14. u2slow

    u2slow 1/2 ton status

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    I would say the choice comes down to the range you're taking your game at. The 7mm mag. is excellent at long range, but overkill close-up. My close-range 7mm experience has the bullet punch clean through, or completely disinitegrate /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    The .270 is a good deer round that can take elk as well. Should be decent for varmint because of the lighter rounds and resulting flat trajectory.

    The .30-06 is the same casing (as .270) only with the larger .30 cal. bullet so you can take bigger game. As stated, the variety of loads is unmatched.

    Most rifles with enclosed magazine will hold 5 rounds of the .270 or .30-06, but only three 7mm rounds (because of the fatter casing).

    Because of the physical size of these rounds, they require a long action - and the 7mm mag. is probably extra beefy to boot. This means more metal in the rifle, which means a heavier weapon. "Short" rounds like a .308 or 7mm-08 typically make for a lighter gun.
     
  15. got_mud

    got_mud 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]

    Oh, and I forgot to say...when I say practice, I mean half a box max...after 6 shots w/ the high caliber stuff the shoulder starts hurting! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]
    uh... yeah.
    well, this is the new toy:
    [​IMG]
    remington 710 30-06 springfield. factory scoped with the bushnell 3-9x40, VERY light synthetic stock, 4 round magazine.
    i took heed to the many comments i had heard and read and learned quite a bit from them. i liked the variety of loads available for the 06 and for its versatility. i searched for the best deal and came across a display arm from the local rusty's that had closed and picked it up from a pawn shop in new condition with all original accessories. i had two smiths look at it and both said that it was not likely to have more than the factory test fires through it. i put my first shot through it and pulled my signature high and right and followed it with two more for a high and right 2 1/4 inch group at 100 yards with the scope inadvertently at 3 power. twisting the power to 9 didn't get me in the ten ring. i worked the scope a bit and eventually got a 4 inch group centered on the ten ring, but they progressively loosened from there.
    as for shoulder pain, 35 rounds of 150 gr winchester power point plus followed by 10 rounds of 180 gr remington core-lokt has earned me a weekend on the couch. even remote controlling is in question. well worth it, though. as i am now comfortable with my new freezer-filler.
     
  16. 77Jimmy

    77Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    45 rounds w/ a high power rifle! Ugh...my shoulder hurts just thinking about that! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif You must have a hell of a recoil pad on that or have one hell of a pain threshold. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif I'm about 6'3" 175 pounds and I just don't have the body mass to absorb that many rounds. I take an extra pad (sissy pad) along w/ me to the range. Call me a wuss. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  17. Wingnutt

    Wingnutt 1/2 ton status

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    I guess I might as well jump in the fray since I’ve owned all of the calibers discussed here at one time or another. The Savage 110 is a great buy for the $$. The rifle’s trigger sucks, but that is now easily fixed since a lot of companies make a replacement trigger for the 110 now. Personally I prefer the tactical models because of their heavier and longer barrels, which improve accuracy.

    As far as caliber, unless you have a muzzle brake, and a good recoil pad, the 7mm Mag is a shoulder bruiser. If you are going to dreading the recoil, you WILL develop a nasty flinch, which will destroy any attempts at accuracy. True it shoots a little flatter, but unless you are very experienced high power rifleman you won’t like touching off the 7mm Mag (unless, like me, you enjoy the recoil and blast of magnum rounds). Also as discussed above, most rifles’ magazines will only hold three rounds. I knew a few nuts when I was stationed out in Montana who blasted Parrie Dogs with 7mm Mags, but they downloaded them and used very lightweight bullets; better their shoulders than mine. Ammo ain’t cheap either; the last box I saw sold for $25. IMHO, for anything smaller than Elk or long shots at Mulies, the 7mm Mag is overkill.

    Now we come to my personal favorite, the 30-06. This round has been around since 1906 (hence it’s name: caliber 30 of 1906) and has been used to shoot everything from Parrie Dogs to humans to Grizzly Bears. The recoil is very manageable even in a light seven-pound rifle. If you add a good quality recoil pad, the rifle will be a joy to shoot. My current all-around rifle is a Winchester Model 70 with the pre ’64 action in ’06. With a full magazine of five and a 4x12x50 Simmons scope and sling, it weighs in at a shade over 8 pounds and has a nice recoil pad on it. I can shoot it all day and not bruise my shoulder. Bullets weights run from 82gr varmint bullets to 22gr solids for large dangerous game, and just about anything in-between for hand loaders. In stores (even mom & pop stores out in the boonies) you can buy factory loads from 150gr to 200gr for about $12 a box.

    Now the 270, the 30-06’s little brother. Accuracy isn’t too bad, and it shoots a tad flatter than the ’06 due to its lighter bullets, and the recoil is less than the ’06...but not by a large amount. Like the 308, any thing they can do, the ’06 can do better. Ammo selection and availability is more limited than the 7mm Mag or the ’06 and slightly more expensive than the ’06.

    All three can and have taken thousands of deer and more than a few Elk; but like an old fellow I knew in Montana said: ”it ain’t so much as what you are shooting, but where you put the bullet that counts”. This ‘ol fellow used an ancient 30-30 for everything, including Elk. He stalked them like an archery hunter; he once told me that his longest shot at an Elk was just over 75yds. Well within the 30-30’s ability for such a large animal.

    Whatever you decide on, practice, practice, and practice until you have complete confidence in you rifle and YOUR abilities with it. Here’s what a friend told me when I started bench-rest shooting: “good shooting starts with the acceptance of pain; great shooting starts with the love of pain’. Also good advice. One last thing, remember whatever caliber you choose, the exact same force that you send out of the end of the barrel to mow down your target will also be coming right back at the flesh your quivering shoulder through the recoil.
     

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