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A tip for getting the jam nut in/out in your front hubs

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Blue85, Apr 23, 2001.

  1. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    Just a simple trick I figured out. It's possible that all of you are doing it already, but I thought that I would pass it along.

    When you need to break loose (or tighten) the nut that holds in the front wheel bearings, it can be a pain to put the required torque through the socket without the socket rocking out of place. Just put a jackstand underneath the head of the wrench or underneath the socket and orient the wrench so that you are pushing straight down on the handle. This transfers the force that would rock the socket out of place into the jackstand and the socket stays exactly where you want it as you apply force. Doing this makes the job so easy that I don't even struggle to get 190 ft-lbs anymore.

    <font color=green>"MAN THOUGHT HURT BUT SLIGHTLY DEAD" --Providence (R.I.) Journal</font color=green>
     
  2. Wheels

    Wheels 1/2 ton status

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    190 ft lbs on the jam nut??????
     
  3. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    I've had that problem using cheapie parts store sockets. I've got a Snap-On hub socket that doesn't slip or twist a bit. It works way better than the cheapies that I've tried. Picked it up from a buddy for $15 or $20 many years ago. Don't know what they sell for out of the truck... It's probably scary! [​IMG]

    For the folks that have 14-bolt FF rears and Dana 44 or 10-bolt fronts, MAC Tools sells a really slick socket that is 2 sockets in one. The outer diameter has 6 tangs to fit the rear nuts while the inner diameter has 4 tangs that fit the front nuts. Cost $35, but the ones I could find that fit only the rear cost about $30. Plus it means one less tool to carry with you! [​IMG]

    <font color=black>HarryH3 - '75 K5</font color=black>
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://ThunderTruck.ColoradoK5.com>http://ThunderTruck.ColoradoK5.com</A>
    It's a great day to be alive...
     
  4. Executioner

    Executioner 1/2 ton status

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    I agree ! sound like somebody has been reading too much
    Hope this misinformation does not sprred to far, its a bitch to strip the threads on the spindle, and remove the inner
    nut.
     
  5. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    We had a "discusion" about the torque settings for that very nut. It would appear anywere between 50ftlbs to 190ftlbs is the proper setting[​IMG],.............lol

    72K5[​IMG]Led Zeppelin[​IMG]Rock ON![​IMG]
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.burt4x4.coloradok5.com>http://www.burt4x4.coloradok5.com</A>
     
  6. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    I almost always set to 150-160 ft-lbs. Is this too much? The Haynes I read says 160-210.
    But there are at least 3 different nut/washer combinations, each of which probably has a different torque spec. Mine is the one without any pegs in the washer, just a nut, the washer which is indexed on the spindle and then another nut, which is a jam nut to keep the inner nut from turning. I know that the setups with the bend over tang or the pin in the washer to hold the inner nut in place both require a lot less torque.

    I'm not saying that your rig needs a ton of torque, I'm just saying that this is a good technique to keep the socket in place while you do it.

    <font color=green>"MAN THOUGHT HURT BUT SLIGHTLY DEAD" --Providence (R.I.) Journal</font color=green>
     
  7. DMK

    DMK 1/2 ton status

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    78 shop manual says at least 150ft lbs.
     
  8. doonjumper

    doonjumper 1/2 ton status

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    I guess I need to torqe my jamb nuts a lot more than I am doing now.


    [​IMG]<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by doonjumper on 04/23/01 10:37 PM (server time).</FONT></P>
     
  9. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    Executioner,
    Do you have any more to say? Perhaps I just don't understand your last post because of all the typos. I don't know...

    From what I've heard, the auto hub (for anybody who still has them) can be engaged or messed up if the outer nut comes loose. It seems like you would notice the difference in the steering response from the loose wheel bearings before that, but that's just what I've heard. I've never heard of a stripped spindle before though. They look pretty tough...

    <font color=green>"MAN THOUGHT HURT BUT SLIGHTLY DEAD" --Providence (R.I.) Journal</font color=green>
     
  10. Executioner

    Executioner 1/2 ton status

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    From a mechanical engineering point of view........
    The spindle and nut are about 2" in diameter, the threads on the spindle are fine( Course Med. Fine)
    regardless of what may be in any manuel 190 lbs./ft. is too much torque.
    Use lug nuts as an exsample/ or the nut on the rear output of a NP205/NP203 T-case
    and these exsample are rotoating the spindle and nut are staycinary.
     
  11. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    You forgot to mention that the maximum acceptable torque depends on the metalurgical properties of the nut and spindle, neither of which we know. What would be interesting is to know what torque was applied to these in the factory.

    What contradicts your theory is the fact that hundreds of wheel bearings have been changed and the nuts torqued to at least 150, in most cases several times over the life of the vehicle. Shoot, a lot of places tighten your lug nuts to over 100 ft. lbs with their air wrench (jerks [​IMG] ) and those are tiny in comparison.

    <font color=green>"MAN THOUGHT HURT BUT SLIGHTLY DEAD" --Providence (R.I.) Journal</font color=green>
     
  12. jimmyjack

    jimmyjack 1/2 ton status

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    How tight is the inner nut supposed to be torqued down? I had the outer nut spin off and it let the inner run of a little bit. Had about an inch of in/out play!!!! I don't have a torque wrench, I usually tighten the inner nut moderately then put on the crown washer and crank the outer.

    "My blazer may be slow, but it goes faster at higher speeds"

    Jim
     
  13. Executioner

    Executioner 1/2 ton status

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    There are no unknows that the designer's have not considered. I bite the bullet and swallow 150, but anything more
    is just not RIGHT in my book.
     

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