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About to buy a K5 - just need tips on transporting.

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by mountainibis, Mar 27, 2003.

  1. mountainibis

    mountainibis Registered Member

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    OK, I did a search on towing a K5, but didn't get all of my questions answered. So, here goes.

    I think I found a 1st gen Blazer that suits my fancy. But, it's 1100 miles away and not able to make the trip on its own power. My tow vehicle is a 1/2 ton Chevy long-bed, and, after reading old posts, I don't think I want to try to flat tow it without a little more heft.

    Uhaul says their trailers can tow a vehicle with a width of 79 1/4". The K5 I'm looking at has 33's on it. If I bring a shoe-horn and some grease, would it fit on the trailer?

    If not, what are some of my options? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    I say go for the Uhaul tow dolley but bring 2 rims with 235/75R15 tires to put on the front. Go slow on any big hills or mountain passes.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Tuff

    Tuff Registered Member

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    I towed mine from Colorado to South carolina with a tow bar. All I did was remove the rear drive shaft. The whole setup cost me like $100. The gas of course was a little more. I tried the uhauls and I couldn't find one the K5 would fit on.
     
  4. aksidentproan

    aksidentproan 1/2 ton status

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    I towed my 1970 K5 with my moms 1998 5.4L Ford Expedition on our 16ft race car trailer and I had to let a little air out of the front tires to let them slip between the trailer fenders. I only had to tow it about 8 miles but I didn't feel comfortable going over 45-50mph. The main reason was the Expeditions rear suspension was not stiff enough to keep the ride firm. I think I would go the tow dolly route. On the other hand I had a friend tow my truck with a '97 F250 on the same trailer and it had no problem going 75-80mph on the interstate. It all depends on the tow rig.

    Evan
     
  5. mountainibis

    mountainibis Registered Member

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    Thanks for the tips. I'm liking the idea of putting some little donut tires on the front and using a tow dolly.

    Hopefully, in a week or two I can lose my poser status and have my very own money pit. I'll also be able to justify cussing like a sailor when I realize how much work I made for myself.
     
  6. 72beater

    72beater 1/2 ton status

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    just wondering, sometimes having it transported is not that expensive. have you checked? it might compare favorably to the total cost of fuel, tires, dolly rentals, and overall PITA. just my 0.02 dollars worth.
    Ernest
     
  7. chulisohombre

    chulisohombre 1/2 ton status

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    i towed mine completly on a uhaul trailer.i had to drive over the fenders to get it up on the trailer.and then the tires were an inch too wide on either side so they sat up on the rails of the trailer.then the tires were too tall to be strapped down with the tire straps to i just put them around the axles and ties a couple of ratchet straps and a tow strap around the front end to hold it in place.i did not go over 50 mph and went cross country with it behind the ultimate tow rig. a 7.2 liter diesle that was in the uhaul truck i rented for the rest of my junk.with all my stuff loaded and my rig on the trailer i weighed in at around 22000 pounds.cost me 500 dollars in fuel but i dont htink that is too bad.make sure your rear end has good lube if you are going with tow trailer and also that the tires are good on it.i wish i would have gotten some little donut tires on my rigto put on the trailer with.would have helped out alot with being safer on the trailer.
     
  8. Okiemuddog

    Okiemuddog 1/2 ton status

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    Okay, I am going to save you sometime and trouble, looked in to having transported. I just recently bought my K5 with a 4" and 33's. I tow dollied mine after 3 tries and different tires, I got it home, but I only went 40 miles at 45 MPH. Alright the first problem you are going to have is if you use donuts the fenders are going to rake the fenders on the dolly and the lockouts are going to hit the inside of the fenders. The other problem is that the front axles are wider than the rears. I had to change the rear tires on mine to a set 235/85/16 pull up on the dolly backward, lock the steering wheel and had to let the air our of the back tires to get the straps around them. I was towing with a 1990 2wd suburban and the K5 was all over the road. I has a major PITA trying to get it home.

    Just my 2 cents
     
  9. mountainibis

    mountainibis Registered Member

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    Well, the guy I wanted to buy the K5 from sold it locally. So, after gearing up for a road trip and a new ride, now I'm just full of piss and vinegar. /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif Oh well.

    Thanks for the suggestions. When I do find one, at least I know what I'll be up against if I have to tow it home.
     

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