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Acting like a dog!

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by OLDSTEEL, Sep 7, 2002.

  1. OLDSTEEL

    OLDSTEEL 1/2 ton status

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    I just finished a complete engine re-build and a tranny swap, the engine runs great but when I put it in gear I have very little power. I have done a complete vacume check, checked for brake drag, changed the carb step-up springs set and reset timing and replaced the modulator, the thing still acts like a dog. This has lead me to the torque converter I think the new one is only stock. Could the moderate Cam I put in be causing the problem. In neutral I have to set idle @ 950-1000 rpm to make the engine run right and to put it into gear without stalling. I am considering going to an 1800-2000 stall converter. I just want to know if anyone else has had this type of problem befor and if I'm on the right track.
     
  2. OLDSTEEL

    OLDSTEEL 1/2 ton status

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    Now I know someone has insight on this!
     
  3. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Sound to me like you've got a vacuum leak.
     
  4. Blazer_Boy

    Blazer_Boy 1/2 ton status

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    Intake leak. What are carb step-up springs? What are your cam specs. What is your exact timing setup. You initial setting, how degrees your vac advance is rated for and where you have the vac advance plugged into (check for vacuum at idle). Back in the days of ignorance (last winter, lol) I had the wrong timing tab and 20 degrees of vacuum advance on full vacuum. So I was getting like 50+ degrees at idle making for stalls and falling on its face after I let out on the clutch. Some tikering and dinkering, alot of reading, and a snap-on timing light and things are just peachy.
     
  5. Jay73K20

    Jay73K20 Registered Member

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    Hey blaver boy, you finally got your timing corrected. Can you run 10 degrees at Idle.
     
  6. Blazer_Boy

    Blazer_Boy 1/2 ton status

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    Oh boy, what a difference a few months can make. My knocking noise when warm was related to the starter. You could hear the starter gear shake when you cranked it over for an extended period. I found a near new one up at the shop with a broken head. I took an old starter and combined the parts for one fine, free starter.

    To be honest, I can't rember which problem you are referring to, there were so many, lol. The core I used for my engine was one from a burned up '74 Blazer. The damper was toast along with the timing chain cover. GM put the timing mark in two different spots over the years and I had to get the right combination. Now thats all peachy. I'm running a big ol' 16 degrees at idle. Thats so I can hit 36 degrees total, since HEIs give 20.

    I since bought a fancy boy snap-on timing light, done some reading, and experimenting. I even got to time some race cars up. The generic rule of thumb is 36 degrees total by 3,000 rpm. Thats not set in stone now, but will get you in the ball park.

    Maybe I've learned too much. Some guy at Chevytalk was getting trounced on by everyone because he had a "high" initial timing of 14 degrees. I told him not to worry and what he should shoot for. Well, it all fell apart after there and I'm not over there anymore, haha /forums/images/icons/wink.gif
     

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