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Adjusting torsion bars

Discussion in '1992-Present Chevy & GMC models' started by **DONOTDELETE**, Apr 1, 2002.

    My 95 Yukon rubs the front tires at the front fender just a touch when turning. Are the torsion bars adjusted by the bolt that runs perpendicular to the torsion bar?
     
  1. Go to the rear of the torsion bar and then just to the inside on both where they are mounted through the crossmember and that bolt that goes straight up is it. Take some good before measurements and then after you adjust it, go drive around and come back and measure again to make sure you are setting even and have the extra lift you needed. Just remember the more you crank on them the stiffer your ride will get. I did this to my 96 2 door Tahoe to make it level and I lifted the front almost 2" without affecting the ride too much. Good luck ~!!
     
  2. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    Don't go nuts with it.

    Maybe you can trim the plastic a bit.
     
  3. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    <blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr>

    the more you crank on them the stiffer your ride will get

    <hr></blockquote>
    I've heard this before, but it doesn't make sense to me. Cranking up the torsion bar adjusters doesn't change the spring rate of the torsion bars, it just changes the angle of the twist. Cranking them way up can create a situation when there is nearly no droop left in the front suspension, but the torsion bar itself hasn't been made any stiffer. It will still have the same spring rate. It's sort of analogous to putting lift blocks on a leaf spring setup. The truck sits higher, but the spring rate is unchanged.
     
  4. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    I agree, I think it feels stiffer because the suspenssion is topping out sooner, giveing it a harsh ride.

    Allthough, I've seen 'em cranked all the way. I would think that would preload the bar a bit and raise it's spring rate.
     
  5. A torsion bar works from the twisting it does when the suspension travels. It is pre-loaded at the factory and has a certain spring rating, so if you adjust it and put more of a pre-load on the torsion bar it will change the rating to a slight degree giving the torsion bar less movement hence the stiffer ride.
     
  6. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    The "pre-load" just adjusts the ride height by changing the angle of the mounting point. You can change the "pre-load" in a similar fashion on a leaf spring by installing longer shackles. Or on a coil-sprung truck by installing a spacer between the spring and it's mounting bucket. Again, you've changed the mounting point. That still doesn't change the rate at which the spring will compress (or at which a torsion bar will twist). That rate is determined by the type of steel, diameter of the bar, etc.

    If the truck is sitting at rest and you rotate the torsion bar adjuster so that it rotates in the direction that lifts the truck, the end of the bar that is attached to the front suspension will rotate the same amount as the end of the bar that is in the adjuster. The spring rate remains constant, and the weight it is supporting have not changed, only it's point of reference has changed.
     
  7. GMCLegacy

    GMCLegacy 1/2 ton status

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    it feels stiffer becasue you are changing the angle that the front IFS sits at. the IFS is further aways from being parallel to the ground, thus giving you a stiffer ride and eating the outsides of your tires.
     
  8. I made the adjustment last night and went up 1" overall. When I made my initial measurements the driver's side was almost 1/2" lower than the passenger side. One extra turn got the fender measurements pretty much level. 1" got the clearance I needed but now my Yukon has definite saggy butt syndrome. Wonder how likely it would be to find someone here with some 2" blocks I could use on the rear to level it out.

    So far I haven't notice anything different with ride quality. I'm guessing with only a 1" change that should be very minimal.

    Now for a stupid question, where do I make the adjustment to lower my headlight beams a touch? I see how to take them out, but I don't see anything for adjusting them.
     

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