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Allen wrench question - help!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by TX Mudder, Jul 10, 2004.

  1. TX Mudder

    TX Mudder 1/2 ton status

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    Ok, I have an allen bolt that takes a 3/32" allen wrench. I have stripped 2 allen wrenches trying to remove it.

    Two quetions:
    1. Do they make higher strength allen wrenches? Maybe mine are just cheap. Where can I find them?
    2. It is possible someone used red loc-tite on this tiny allen bolt. Isn't it true that if I heat it up to like 500 F the loctite will let go? I have an oxy/acetylene rig that I use to cut steel. Is that OK to use? The steel that this bolt is in is heat treated and I do NOT want to anneal the metal, or whatever it is called when you soften it.


    Someone help me as I feel dumb not being able to get this little booger out.
     
  2. big83chevy4x4

    big83chevy4x4 3/4 ton status

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    ive learnt that the more money you pay for the allen wrenches, the stronger, better fitting they are.

    did you try a torkes bit? just take one about the same size and tap it all the way in and use a ratchet to break it loose
     
  3. 84gmcjimmy

    84gmcjimmy 1 ton status

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    Yes, if it is lock tite in there, the only way to get it out is to heat it up. Like big83 said, the more expensive allen keys are better. I stripped 3 allen keys trying to get some bolts off the front hubs. because they were cheap ones.
     
  4. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I have heard (maybe mis-heard?) that if you don't quench the metal, (IE change the temperature very fast, like dipping in water) you will NOT affect the metals "heat treatment".
     
  5. TX Mudder

    TX Mudder 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]


    did you try a torkes bit? just take one about the same size and tap it all the way in and use a ratchet to break it loose

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I took your advice. My smallest tork-head(sic?) bit fits snugly in the 3/32" allen head. With a ratchet and some even pressure it came off great. There were actually two bolts and they both came out with this. I didn't see any loctite so maybe it was just very snug and made of high qaulity steel, and my allen wrenches were not up to task. /forums/images/graemlins/dunno.gif

    Thanks for the advice! That's why I love this place!
     
  6. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I have heard (maybe mis-heard?) that if you don't quench the metal, (IE change the temperature very fast, like dipping in water) you will NOT affect the metals "heat treatment".

    [/ QUOTE ]

    NO No quenching metal from diferent heats, into diferents liquids is a way TO temper steel!!!

    when you heat up some thing and it cools it is usuals weaker!

    if something is tempered/heattreated use heat sparingly, if so your ok but if you heat something up alot (glowing, ever cherri red) you will lose you temper.

    if i wanted to heat a bolt that was on tempered steel i would heat it up a little, then let it cool. Just a bit,then again, then try to crack the bolt. little by little.

    i have gotten very stuck ball joint nuts off with a plumbing torch /forums/images/graemlins/weld.gif 2 min. and comes off smoo /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gifth!!
     

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