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Anti-wrap axle bar

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Tommy, Dec 25, 2001.

  1. Tommy

    Tommy 1/2 ton status

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    Anyone fabbed one of these and mounted it to the top of the differential to help axle wrap? I was thinking of making one out of those tractor bars with the hiem joint ends. I was gonna mouint it to the upper cover bolts, and make the other end mount near the front of the spings to a bar between the frame. Will this work?

    Drive it Like You Hate It!
     
  2. Ryan B.

    Ryan B. 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    There's a little more to it than that if you don't want it to limit your suspension travel.
    Here's a link for a <a target="_blank" href=http://mopar.rockcrawler.com/LinkSystem.htm>4 Link System</a> on a *ahem* Dodge truck. This write up explains it well. And theres some good close up photos if you scroll down at the bottom of the page.
    This guy ran a 4 link but then after wheelin' it he broke one of the upper arms, so now he only runs the two lower traction bars ... like you are talking about...

    I was also thinking of doing something like this... only I'm confused. Half the people i've talked to about this say it won't work for articulation and rockcrawling type of 4 wheelin, and others say its the only way to really plant the traction and stop axle wrap. I mainly take my blazer to Pismo Beach sand dunes so I think these are just what I need for sand draggin' as well as on the pavement. ...though when I go out on some trails those bars might get in the way if there connected to the bottom of the axle housing.
    Hope this helps.

    [REAL MEN DON"T CARE ABOUT GAS MILEAGE OR RAPID TIRE WEAR!]
    Ryan B.
     
  3. Steve_Chin

    Steve_Chin 1/2 ton status

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    You will be better served by mounting your radius rods below the axle center line as close to the axle tube as possible (with the forward ends as close as coincident as possible with the front spring eyes). Mounting a radius rod above the centerline will result in a change in the suspension's longitudinal instant center and also introduce a variable bind in the suspension.
     
  4. Tommy

    Tommy 1/2 ton status

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    The reason I wanted to go to the top is because I have a 6" lift, and it looks as if it would be slightly downhill to the pumpkin top, if I went under, I would have a bad angle down, plus it would hang up on stuff. The reason I ask is I have seen the 3-link setups mounted to the center top of the pumpkin. I am prolly gonna try it this way, and see if it works.

    Drive it Like You Hate It!
     
  5. Ryan B.

    Ryan B. 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I think that guy who did the write up on that 4 link setup, mentioned that he tried the 3 link or wish bone style traction device and he broke it after wheeling just a few times.
    Thats also what I was concerned about too though, is getting them hung up if they are mounted to the bottom of the axle tubing.

    [REAL MEN DON"T CARE ABOUT GAS MILEAGE OR RAPID TIRE WEAR!]
    Ryan B.
     
  6. Steve_Chin

    Steve_Chin 1/2 ton status

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    Be aware that you will need to install a housing floater if you go with a setup like that. The locator device will cause a change in the way the axle wants to rotate and bind up the suspension somewhat. Also, mounting a trailing arm up above the axle centerline will cause the rear end to lift somewhat off the ground as torque is applied in the forward direction, causing the springs to wind up more.

    Take a look at the systems that are commercially available for some other trucks. All of them mount the control arms below the axle centerline, for good reason. If you are concerned with hanging the truck up on one of the locator devices, you should probably design in a rather generous amount of material so that you don't bend them. Another thing I'd consider since you don't really have all that much lift on there (it's all spring and not blocks, right? Blocks create lots of trouble with axle-wrap) is a change in spring design that biases a couple of leaves toward the front spring eye to prevent axle-wrap.
     

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