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any electricians in the house?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by ryoken, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    ok, i've decided to make the plunge.. i've grown to despise my job the last couple years and my boss has been a total a$$ for the last year.. i'm getting out of the marine business and going to work for my brother in law as an apprentice electrician..

    not sure when i'll be starting, prolly after the new year.. it will entail me moving, thus why i'm not starting right away..

    but i know at least him and his brother will treat me fairly.. obviously i'll have to take a pay cut to start. but i'm sure after a few years i'll be making what i make now with room for improvement.. its a small non-union shop..

    i have a fairly good background with AC from the boats, but am looking for online places to help me learn as much as i can.. anyone know any good sites or have some words of wisdom for me?
     
  2. mofugly13

    mofugly13 1 ton bucket of rust Premium Member

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    I am an electrician, but I don't really know where you would look online for electrical knowledge. I did a 5 year apprenticeship through my union, which involved 5 years of classes, 2.5 hours a night, two nights a week, as well as OJT for 40 hours a week. I really didn't know any electrical theory, except for some basic DC theory, before I started. I would look at finding a class through your local community college that will present AC and DC theory. I am sure there is a school in your area where you can learn theory, or you can apply for the Union, where you will get excellent classroom as well as on the job training. In my area there are non-union apprenticeship classes that will teach the theory, which is important. You can't learn it ALL on the job. So, I woud look into classes. I *think* that classroom time is required for you to be recognized as a journeyman electrician, and there may be a state certification you may need to go through. These requirements should be looked into, as you want to be able to make sure your apprenticeship is recognized by the state.

    I guess I really didn't answer any of your questions, but I hope I provided some useful info for you.

    I would definitely look into finding some actual classroom time, where you are able to ask questions on concepts you are unclear with. Pay attention to all the theory. It will make you a good troubleshooter. A good installer/troubleshooter is an asset for any shop. If you can find the problem and fix it fast, you make more money for the shop, which makes you valuble. Hope some of this helps.
     
  3. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    that was very useful, thanks...

    didn't realize there was quite that much class time needed. but thats ok.. i'm sure my bro in law will hook me up with my best options for that stuff.. reading material too...

    thanks again... i'm not usually one for such a big change, hate starting new jobs, been where i'm at for like 13 yrs... but i'm psyched on it, think i'll enjoy it...
     
  4. yunit

    yunit 1/2 ton status

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    PM Patrick "ramjet gmc", he is certified in NJ and can definitely help you out. I know he is out of town until Dec. 6th, but may be checking the site.
     
  5. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Send a PM to VTBlazer....

    He's owns his own electrical company, and has done some work for me at my place. He could probably give you some insights into what it's really like, etc.
     
  6. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    my brother is certifid, and i know enuff to work do his side jobs.

    his company just went union, so now he is going to try to get me in as a seconed year.. well see..
     
  7. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    here some fun electrical pics for you just dont do it like this.

    btw i have NO assosation with this house it was in a town 4 hours from here i was doing a job (windows) in and saw it and took pics for my brother.


    does make it easy to work on i guess......

    P8030001.JPG

    P8030002.JPG
     
  8. 3 on the tree

    3 on the tree 1/2 ton status

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    You'll love this one. I am inthemiddle of a remodel of a condo built in 79. I tear out the flood damaged sheetrock 4 feet up. Surprise! Someone moved the line voltage thermostat to the 220V heaters. They just cut a notch in the studs, and laid the wires in the notches. Used drywall nails to hold the wires in place. Surprise #2-there used to be wall sconces in the living room. The last remodel, they just removed the lights, and mudded in the boxes with the live wires still inside. #3-The hot feed for those lights was a splice off an outlet. I mean a splice, complete with duct tape, notched into the sheetrock! I guess people don't realize how DANGEROUS this **** is. I have never had a boring remodeling job, always a surprise or two.
     

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