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anyone ever convert to Natural gas?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by uglychevyZZ4, Apr 3, 2004.

  1. uglychevyZZ4

    uglychevyZZ4 3/4 ton status

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    im looking at doing this to our house we just bought and how much od a PITA is it?
     
  2. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    What kind of system are you on now? Propane? Electricity?

    Is there gas near the house already?
     
  3. uglychevyZZ4

    uglychevyZZ4 3/4 ton status

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    we just bought a house and gas is at the street, and theyll bring it to the house free, just have to plumb it and such. it is baseboard now, EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW /forums/images/graemlins/hack.gif /forums/images/graemlins/grind.gif thats gotta go!
     
  4. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Well, here's the deal, brother.....

    You have a couple of decisions to make. Most NG systems use forced air furnaces and tin venting to heat a house. If you want to get rid of your baseboard heating you're looking at some pretty big renos to get the tin venting installed throughout your home. Your other option is to stay with the baseboard heaters but switch to a NG boiler. But if it's electric baseboards you're gonna have to install a glycol boiler/transfer system- that'll cost big bucks too. If you're on propane with the glycol system already in place then you may get away with changing out the orifices in your burners(or maybe the entire burner system) in order to use natural gas.

    What you might consider is to get a NG fireplace installed on each floor to supplement your existing heating system.

    Is your basement developed?
     
  5. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    What you might consider is to get a NG fireplace installed on each floor to supplement your existing heating system.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Paul, does anyone make gas fireplaces that are decently efficient? All the ones that I've seen send 35-40% of the heat right out the chimney. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
     
  6. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Since we don't know where ya live it's hard to know what kind of winters you have to deal with. But if you live in a cold climate oil fired or gas fired forced hot water baseboard heat works quite nicely. But if you currently have electric baseboard heat in each room then your electric bills are gonna be downright scary in the winter. /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif
     
  7. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    The models equipped with fan systems really throw out a lot of heat. You can also buy NG fireplaces with heat exchange systems built right into them- I've seen a house that was primarily heated by ONE fireplace venting into three different rooms.

    I can't say exactly what kind of efficiency most NG fireplaces have, but I do know that any gas appliance that vents outside loses a certain percentage. Right now they make high-efficiency furnaces that are supposedly 95% efficient, but they cost around $8000 CDN....... /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif
     
  8. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Our current 140K BTU furnace is rated at 80% efficiency. But our gas fireplaces are only rated at 55% or so. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif So we don't use the fireplaces much, other than to add some flair. It's way cheaper to let the furnace do its thing as it doesn't waste so much of the heat. Upgrading to a 95% efficiency furnace also costs big bucks in the US. So much so that it would take a VERY long time to pay for itself. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  9. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    I personally love pellet fuel.
     
  10. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I personally love pellet fuel.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Does it provide all your heat? If so, what is the monthly cost? I've looked at the pellet fuel stoves, but the price of the pellets seemed like it would add up to at least the cost of my monthly gas bill. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  11. BurbinOR

    BurbinOR 3/4 ton status

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    If you already have the duct work it is pretty simple. We did it at two houses that had forced air electric. Gas company ran the lines to the house, we ran from the meter to the furnace area, swapped out electric furnace for gas furnace (a few hour job including the sheet metal rework) and we were done.



    Helps to have a father in law work for Northwest Natural Gas too. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  12. hi pinion

    hi pinion 3/4 ton status

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    hey man,hows it goin.let me know if ya need questions answered about whole houuse gas re-piping,i do these all the time.....i suggest that your very careful lol,gas is very dangerous.i had a freind who had a ZZ top beard ,one day,and the next ,did not,due to flames from a water heater burner assembly /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif.......the best way to run your pipe,would be to find a straight run,(or straight as poss)for your main trunkline,and branch off from there.....to all your gas fixtures.make sure you size your gas pipe accordingly,otherwise,you can suck the pilot light out of your water heater when you turn on the stove,anyway,good luck..Jake /forums/images/graemlins/peace.gif
     
  13. uglychevyZZ4

    uglychevyZZ4 3/4 ton status

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    - I live in the Seattle area
    -well, it isnt ducted, no problem. here i can get 50 feet of 4 or 6" ducting for $8.00 /forums/images/graemlins/peace.gif
    -isnted plumbed, ill have to do that part /forums/images/graemlins/hack.gif which Ive done before minorly.
    -The gas co. will run it to the house and install a meter all free /forums/images/graemlins/woot.gif

    ------WHAT'S the difference beetween a gas furnace with A/C and a heat pump? I dunno which one I want?
    ------ is a gas water heater and stove more efficient? should i bother changing those 2?
     
  14. gm4x

    gm4x 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    - I live in the Seattle area
    -well, it isnt ducted, no problem. here i can get 50 feet of 4 or 6" ducting for $8.00 /forums/images/graemlins/peace.gif
    -isnted plumbed, ill have to do that part /forums/images/graemlins/hack.gif which Ive done before minorly.
    -The gas co. will run it to the house and install a meter all free /forums/images/graemlins/woot.gif

    ------WHAT'S the difference beetween a gas furnace with A/C and a heat pump? I dunno which one I want?
    ------ is a gas water heater and stove more efficient? should i bother changing those 2?

    [/ QUOTE ]
    LP gas runs a manifold prssure of 11-14" WC (water column) Natural gas is 3.5"WC. LP orfices (pilot & main) are smaller than Natural because it's under more pressure. Conversion from LP to nat involves drilling out main & pilot orvices, and converting the pressure regulator in the main gas valve (which sometime can't be done) or replacing the valve.
    If it's hot water heat (boiler), people here love em, but you have no ductwork for A/C. If you're starting from scratch, go 90% furnace & 10-12 SEER A/C (if you even want it) If you don't want the A/C now, be sure to install evaporator coil box with furnace, then you can add A/C later without re-working things. Not sure what your normal winters are like there, but if it stays well below freezing avoid heatpumps. Life expectency here (IN) for one is 7 years. A heat pump is an A/C with a reversing valve. Ever notice in the summer the hot air blowing out of the outdoor unit (condenser)? That's the heat being removed & transferred out of your house to the outdoors. A heat pump (in heat mode) reverses flow of freon and basically then turns your indoor (evaporator) coil into the condensed, transfering heat INSIDE from outdoors. It may only be 35 out, but there is still heat in the air that is picked-up & transferred indoors. Compression ratio on compressor is MUCH higher in heat mode, than in cooling also, meaning it's harder on it to heat than to cool.
    Be SURE you get a properly designed duct system. I've seen alot of jobs where people just run abunch of 6" flex, it may work, but be inefficient. Proper sizing involves static pressures & CFM, heat gain/loss. BTW, I've been in HVAC for 32 years /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif Natural gas is the best way to go, as far as water heaters nat gas has a faster recovery rate than ele. Gas cook stoves are usually convertible from nat to LP (no cost for parts) by adjusting the orfice-hoods behind the knobs (under the lid of the stove). Gas fireplaces? Well, there are vent-free ones (if your house isn't a brand-new super-tight one) and why all new vent-free appliances (should) have an oxygen depletion saftey. If a gas appliance has no flue, it's basically 100% efficient (no stack loss) that's why the 90% furnaces vent in 2-3" PVC. My average price to home-owner for say a 3-BR ranch house & 90% furn, 10.SEER A/C, completer duct system w/electrostatic air cleaner......$5500-6000. But, I was a one-man show too, so I could work alittle cheaper. Hope this helps /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  15. gm4x

    gm4x 1/2 ton status

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    One other thing. If you do want A/C consider a Puron (or R-410) system. Ya'll know the story with the EPA & flourocarbons. R-12 was banned (why automotive switched to R-134A) and the same happened to R-22 (most common freon), meaning they are no longer in production. There are "drop-in" replacements for R-22, but I'd make the switch to Puron or such before it was necessary.
     
  16. 88Silverado

    88Silverado 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    anyone ever convert to Natural gas?


    [/ QUOTE ]
    Yea...every day. I eat food then convert it to Natural Gas /forums/images/graemlins/woot.gif
     
  17. gm4x

    gm4x 1/2 ton status

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    Sorry dude....that's Methane /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif
     

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