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Anyone got broken engine blocks laying around?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by dyeager535, Jun 30, 2003.

  1. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I just need a small sample, about 1" by 1" square. Apparently shavings from drilling will work, but I'd rather not risk the drill bit coating or material contamination.

    When (if) pieces are obtained, I like to know as much as possible about the block. A lot of info can come from the suffix code, but block casting number, location of the "010" and/or "020" (above oil filter pad, under timing chain cover, at bellhousing mating surface, etc), 2 vs. 4 bolt, date code, and any other cast in letters/numbers are all appreciated. (instead of "010" you might see "089" in the bellhousing area for instance, although I made that number up. I've seen other numbers there.) Helps to ensure that any results will be indisputable based on year especially, since some people also believe that earlier blocks had better metal composition.

    Of course, only testing one year of a casting number won't tell the whole story, but if say two blocks from the late 60's are tested (one 010 and one not) and then a block from '79 without that is tested, you can probably rightly assume if the '79 block has less added material than either of the 60's blocks, GM got cheaper later on, which would be par for the course.

    I'm working on this for other GM blocks as well, Oldsmobile for instance is rumored to have had better material in their blocks than Chev (of course no proof there either) so I'm accepting samples from the 5 GM Divisions to have tested at the same time.

    Copied and pasted this as a response from another post, so to clarify, what I'm doing is trying to gather as many samples as possible, and send them off to a lab to get them tested. They will be looking for metal composition differences based on year and casting ID numbers, since these are the most common "myth's" (my word) surrounding GM engine block material.

    I ask that the sender eat the shipping to me (it's not much for such a small sample), and I'll eat the shipping cost of all the samples to the lab. It's been very hard to get people to actually send me samples. Lots of response typically, very little follow through, so don't expect to see lab results right away, unless somehow I get many samples quickly. This is normal of course, so I'm not chastising anyone thats been thinking about it, but hasn't got around to sending it in. I know how busy people are!
     
  2. Sidepipes

    Sidepipes 1/2 ton status

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    If I had known earlier I had a cracked 77 350laying around....... its at the recyclers now..... I'll check the drive way for the pieces that were removed from the block.
     
  3. R72K5

    R72K5 Banned

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I just need a small sample, about 1" by 1" square. Apparently shavings from drilling will work, but I'd rather not risk the drill bit coating or material contamination.

    When (if) pieces are obtained, I like to know as much as possible about the block. A lot of info can come from the suffix code, but block casting number, location of the "010" and/or "020" (above oil filter pad, under timing chain cover, at bellhousing mating surface, etc), 2 vs. 4 bolt, date code, and any other cast in letters/numbers are all appreciated. (instead of "010" you might see "089" in the bellhousing area for instance, although I made that number up. I've seen other numbers there.) Helps to ensure that any results will be indisputable based on year especially, since some people also believe that earlier blocks had better metal composition.

    Of course, only testing one year of a casting number won't tell the whole story, but if say two blocks from the late 60's are tested (one 010 and one not) and then a block from '79 without that is tested, you can probably rightly assume if the '79 block has less added material than either of the 60's blocks, GM got cheaper later on, which would be par for the course.

    I'm working on this for other GM blocks as well, Oldsmobile for instance is rumored to have had better material in their blocks than Chev (of course no proof there either) so I'm accepting samples from the 5 GM Divisions to have tested at the same time.

    Copied and pasted this as a response from another post, so to clarify, what I'm doing is trying to gather as many samples as possible, and send them off to a lab to get them tested. They will be looking for metal composition differences based on year and casting ID numbers, since these are the most common "myth's" (my word) surrounding GM engine block material.

    I ask that the sender eat the shipping to me (it's not much for such a small sample), and I'll eat the shipping cost of all the samples to the lab. It's been very hard to get people to actually send me samples. Lots of response typically, very little follow through, so don't expect to see lab results right away, unless somehow I get many samples quickly. This is normal of course, so I'm not chastising anyone thats been thinking about it, but hasn't got around to sending it in. I know how busy people are!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    ive had alot of blocks ive thrown away, most recently mainly '82 305 blocks, i had a page saved all about the GM blocks and nickle and tin content, the blocks with both 010 and 020 on them are the high nickle blocks, theres some tin too
    ill try and find where i saved page shortcut at on this HDD

    i can possibly get you a peice of '82 c10 305 material and maybe 79 350 truck material maybe



    http://www.grapeaperacing.com/GrapeApeRacing/tech/blockchoose.cfm

    Q: What is a Bowtie, or heavy duty (nickle) block and do I have one?

    A: Tin and nickel are two metals that are commonly alloyed with cast iron to improve durability, hardness and heat dissipation. Some production engine blocks have the numbers "010", "020" or both cast into their front face, just above the main bearing bore. (The timing cover must be removed for these numbers to be visible.) If both numbers are present, one about the other, it indicates that the block alloy contains 10% tin and 20% nickel. A single number, either a "010" or "020" represents the amount of nickel and indicates negligible amounts of tin. No numbers, other than the casting numbers that are typically found beneath the timing cover, translates to only minor amounts of tin and nickel being present in the block alloy.

    However, cylinder wall thickness is the overridering consideration - and a block with no tin or nickel and thick cylinder walls is generally preferable to a high nickel block with thin walls.

    http://www.nastyz28.com/faq/engine.htm#alloy
     
  4. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Whatever blocks I can get pieces off of (as long as its GM) I'll take them.
     
  5. wrathORC

    wrathORC 1/2 ton status

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    OK, 1" cubed or what? If so, that's one big chunk of a block. I mean, that's "junk only" kind of a block. I don't know many people that'd keep something like that around. Even most junkyards and/or salvage yards have probably already sold their junk blocks for scrap since they get about $70/ton for junk cast engines even on a bad year.

    I could easily obtain quite a bit of shavings off a block but not that much. It'd be coming off the block with a tungsten carbide burr.
     
  6. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Nah, 1" square.

    Shavings supposedly will work, I'm no metal expert though, so I'm not too sure how that would work with the contamination of whatever was used to shave/cut/drill into the block, along with the lubrication.

    Looks like the easiest place to get that size of metal is the "ear" for the starter. It sticks out there pretty well, and isn't supported as well as most other areas of the block. Might be able to get a chunk out of the main area, knocking an edge off of one of the knobs. Probably weak there for that kind of blow with the bolt hole being close to the edge.

    If shavings would make it much easier and guarantee samples, let me know, and I'll talk to my "source" and see how much shavings he would need.
     
  7. wrathORC

    wrathORC 1/2 ton status

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    1" square has no volume. 1"x1"x what? If it is an amount I can grind off with a die grinder without affecting function of the block then I'll see about figuring out a way to retrieve shavings without contamination (current plan is to have a magnet near discharge wrapped with an inside out ziploc and then turn ziploc right side in). However, if this isn't possible then I won't be contributing. If shavings are possible then I'm sure other people can use the same method.

    I will be heading to my parents' place tomorrow morning (Thursday) if nothing else goes wrong. I have a 1977 LS9 block there sitting on an engine stand that I could grind on. If I don't hear from you before I leave tomorrow then don't plan on me getting any shavings as I despise using 33.6kbps AOL at my parents'.
     
  8. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    1" square meaning it doesn't matter how thick it is /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Go ahead and get shavings, all the castings on the block (include suffix code) and I'll get back on how much I need as soon as I know, prolly be tomorrow.
     
  9. wrathORC

    wrathORC 1/2 ton status

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    OK, I packed my carbides. As long as my Dad still has a functioning die grinder I'll be set. My plan is to pull the heads off the motor anyway because I'll be bringing them back to my place to port.

    As long as we're talking "grams not ounces" then I'm sure I can find places to grind a little off.



    Now if you wanted cylinder head metal... I usually have quite pile of that after I get done porting. hehe.
     
  10. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Now he's saying 1" cubes would be ideal, but they can get info from shavings, so that will be fine. 1/2"x
    1/2"x1/4" is minimum (if chunks) for others reading.
     

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