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ANYONE GOT INFO ON PROPANE??

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by wild-will, Oct 8, 2003.

  1. wild-will

    wild-will 1/2 ton status

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    Anybody here know if i could hook it up to my truck. like the prices and if i could do it myself?
     
  2. Confedneck

    Confedneck 3/4 ton status

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    is the truck diesel? or do you plan to run it as the main fuel?
     
  3. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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  4. wild-will

    wild-will 1/2 ton status

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  5. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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  6. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Search the boards here too...I know I've discussed it a while back.

    What I can tell you is that prices are NOT good. The ACE where I work charges $2.75 a gallon...and that price doesn't fluctuate. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  7. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    propane is good in that it can run at any angle... but the fact that not all stations have it, that you have a high pressure gas bomb attached to your rig, and that propane doesnt have nearly the energy per (insert whatever volume unit you want here) as gasoline means you need more of the stuff to get the same performance. Just my opinion, but the negatives out weigh the posetives.

    j
     
  8. jeffro

    jeffro 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Scurry, TX
    ProductName:
    Propane

    ChemicalName:
    Propane

    Formula:
    C3H8 4

    ChemicalFamily: Alkane (hydrocarbon) 1 0

    Use:
    Various

    Synonyms:
    Dimethylmethane, LP-Gas, Liquified petroleum gas (LPG)

    ¨ ¨


    NFPA Fire: 4 HMIS Fire:
    4 Acute:
    No


    NFPA Health: 1 HMIS Health:
    0 Chronic:
    No


    NFPA Reactivity: 0 HMIS Reactivity:
    0 Fire:
    Yes


    NFPA Special Hazard: Mixture:
    No Reactive:
    No


    Sudden Release Pressure:
    Yes

    02. INGREDIENTS - COMPOSITION & INFORMATION


    PERCENT EXPOSURE GUIDELINES

    COMPONENT CAS No. (BY WT.) OSHA - TWA ACGIH - STEL

    Propane 74-98-6 99.0% 100.0% 1000 Simple Asphyxiant

    LD50: None. LC50: None.

    03. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION


    EMERGENCY OVERVIEW:


    Warning:
    Flammable liquid gas under pressure.


    Can form explosive mixtures with air.


    May cause frostbite.


    Potential Health Effects Information:


    Routes of Exposure:


    Inhalation:
    Simple asphyxiant. It should be noted that before suffocation could occur, the lower


    flammability limit of propane in air would be exceeded; possibly causing both an


    oxygen-deficient and explosive atmosphere. Exposure to concentrations (> 10%)


    may cause dizziness. Exposure to atmospheres containing 8-10% or less oxygen


    will bring about unconsciousness without warning, and so quickly that the individuals


    cannot help or protect themselves. Lack of sufficient oxygen may cause serious


    injury or death.


    Eye Contact:
    Contact with liquid or cold vapor can cause freezing of tissue.


    Skin Contact:
    Contact with liquid or cold vapor can cause frostbite.


    Chronic Effects:
    None.


    Medical Conditions Aggravated By
    None.


    Overexposure:


    Other Effects Of Overexposure:
    None.


    Carcinogenicity:
    Propane is not listed by NTP, OSHA or IARC.

    04. FIRST AID MEASURES


    Inhalation:
    Persons suffering from lack of oxygen should be removed to fresh air. If victim is


    not breathing, administer artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, administer


    oxygen. Obtain prompt medical attention.


    Eye:
    Contact with liquid or cold vapor can cause freezing of tissue. Gently flush eyes


    with lukewarm water. Obtain medical attention immediately.


    Skin:
    Contact with liquid or cold vapor can cause frostbite. Immediately warm affected


    area with lukewarm water not to exceed 105°F (40°C).


    Ingestion:
    None.


    Notes To Physician:
    None.

    05. FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES


    Flash Point:
    -156F (-104C)


    Autoignition:
    842F (432C)


    Flammable Limits - Lower:
    2.2%


    Flammable Limits - Upper:
    9.5%


    Extinguishing Media:
    CO2, dry chemical, water spray or fog for surrounding area. Do not extinguish until


    propane source is shut off.


    Fire Fighting Instructions:
    Evacuate all personnel from danger area. Immediately cool container with water


    spray from maximum distance, taking care not to extinguish flames. If flames are


    accidentally extinguished, explosive re-ignition may occur. Stop flow of gas if


    without risk while continuing cooling water spray.


    Fire And Explosion Hazards:
    Propane is easily ignited. It is heavier than air, therefore, it may collect in low areas


    or travel along the ground where an ignition source may be present. Pressure in a


    container can build up due to heat, and it may rupture if pressure relief devices


    should fail to function.


    Hazardous Combustion Products:
    None known.


    Sensitivity To Static Discharge:
    Possible, container should be grounded.


    Sensitivity To Mechanical Impact:
    None.

    06. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES


    Evacuate:
    Evacuate the immediate area. Eliminate any possible sources of ignition, and


    provide maximum explosion-proof ventilation. Shut off source of propane, if


    possible. If leaking from cylinder, or valve, contact your supplier. Never enter a


    confined space or other area where the concentration is greater than 10% of the


    lower flammable limit which is 0.22%.

    07. HANDLING AND STORAGE


    Storage:
    Specific requirements are listed in NFPA 58. Cylinder storage locations should be


    well-protected, well-ventilated, dry, and separated from combustible materials.


    Cylinders should never knowingly be allowed to reach a temperature exceeding


    125°F (52°C). Cylinders of propane should be separated from oxygen cylinders or


    other oxidizers by a minimum distance of 20 ft., or by a barrier of non-combustible


    material at least 5 ft. high having a fire resistance rating of at least ½ hour. Full and


    empty cylinders should be segregated. Use a first-in, first-out inventory system to


    prevent full containers from being stored for long periods of time.






    Cylinders should be stored upright with valve protection cap in place and firmly


    secured to prevent falling or being knocked over. Protect cylinders from physical


    damage; do not drag, roll, slide or drop. Use a suitable hand truck for cylinder


    movement. Post "No Smoking or Open Flames" signs in the storage areas. There


    should be no sources of ignition. All electrical equipment should be explosion proof


    in the storage and use areas. Storage areas must meet national electric codes for


    class 1 hazardous areas.


    Handling:
    Propane is heavier than air and may collect in low areas that are without proper


    ventilation. Leak check system with leak detection solution, never with flame. If


    user experiences difficulty operating cylinder valve, discontinue use and contact


    supplier. Never insert an object (e.g., wrench, screwdriver, pry bar, etc.) into valve


    cap openings. Doing so may damage valve, causing a leak to occur. Use an


    adjustable strap wrench to remove over-tight or rusted caps. Non-sparking tools


    should be used. Never strike an arc on a compressed gas cylinder or make a


    cylinder a part of an electrical circuit. Electrically bond and ground cylinder when


    transferring liquid product. For additional precautions in using propane see Section


    16 - Other Information.

    08. EXPOSURE CONTROLS - PERSONAL PROTECTION


    Engineering Controls:


    Ventilation:
    Natural or mechanical to prevent accumulation in worker's breathing zone above


    exposure limits. (See Section 2).


    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):


    Clothing:
    Cotton Clothing is recommended for use to prevent static electric buildup.


    Glasses:
    Safety glasses are recommended when handling cylinders.


    Shoes:
    Safety shoes are recommended when handling cylinders.


    Gloves:
    Work gloves are recommended when handling cylinders.


    Respirator:
    None required in general use.


    Emergency Use:
    Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or positive pressure airline with mask


    are to be used in oxygen-deficient atmosphere. Respirators will not function.


    Before entering area, you must check for flammable and oxygen deficient


    atmospheres.

    09. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES


    Physical State:
    Gas


    Color:
    Colorless


    Odor:
    Unodorized propane has a slightly sweet odor. If an odorant has been added it will


    have a strong unpleasant odor.


    Molecular Weight:
    44.097


    Boiling Point:
    -43.67°F ( -42.04°C) @ 1 atm


    Specific Gravity:
    1.5223 At 70°F (21.1°C) @ 1 atm, Air = 1


    Freezing/Melting Point:
    -305.84F (-187.69C) at 1 atm


    Vapor Pressure:
    109.73 psig, (756.56 kPa) at 70°F (21.2°)


    Vapor Density:
    0.110 lb./cu ft (1.1.77kg/CuM), At 70°F (21.1°C) @ 1 atm


    Water Solubility:
    .065 Vol./Vol. At 100° F (37.8°C)


    Expansion Ratio:
    1 to 290 at 70°F (21.1°C)


    pH:
    Not applicable


    Odor Threshold:
    1800 mg/CuM


    Evaporation Rate:
    Not Applicable - Gas


    Coefficient Of Water/Oil Distribution:
    Information not available

    10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY


    Chemical Stability:
    Stable


    Conditions To Avoid:
    None.


    Incompatibility With Other Materials:
    Oxidizing agents.


    Hazardous Decomposition Products:
    None.


    Hazardous Polymerization:
    Will not occur

    11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION


    Other Studies Relevant To Material:
    Propane is nontoxic and is a simple asphyxiant, however it does have slight


    anesthetic properties and higher concentrations may cause dizziness.


    Irritancy Of Material:
    None.


    Reproductive Effects:
    None.


    Teratogenicity:
    None.


    Synergistic Materials:
    None.


    Sensitization To Material:
    None.


    Mutagenicity:
    None.

    12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION


    ECOTOXICITY:
    No adverse ecological effects are expected. Propane does not contain any Class I


    or Class II Ozone depleting chemicals (40 CFR Part 82). Propane is not listed as a


    marine pollutant by DOT (49 CFR Part 171).

    13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS


    Waste Disposal Method:
    Do not attempt to dispose of residual or unused quantities. Return cylinder to


    supplier.


    Residual product within process system may be burned at a controlled rate, if a


    suitable burning unit (flare stack) is available on site. This shall be done in


    accordance with federal, state, and local regulations.

    14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION


    DOT/IMO Shipping Name:
    Propane


    HAZARD CLASS:
    2.1 (Flammable gas.)


    Identification Number:
    UN 1978*


    PIN:
    1978


    Product RQ:
    None.


    Shipping Label:
    Flammable Gas.


    Placard (When Required):
    Flammable gas.


    Special Shipping Information:
    Cylinders should be transported in a secure position, in a well ventilated vehicle.


    The transportation of compressed gas cylinders in automobiles or in closed-body


    vehicles can present serious hazards and should be discouraged.


    Special Shipping Information
    *For domestic transportation only: The identification number UN 1075 may be used


    in place of the identification number UN 1978. The identification number used


    must be consistent on package markings, shipping papers, and emergency response


    information (Special provision 19 from 49 CFR 172.101).

    TOP OF THE PAGE









    WOULD YOU LIKE MORE INFORMATION OR LEAVE A MESSAGE


    ©INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIAL GASES LIMITED. All rights reserved.

    /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  9. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    interesting that the autoignite temp is lower on propane than some of the temps that a catalytic converter can get to. doh... rock shears off propane regulator... propane spills out... next thing ya know you're saying "hey, u smell something... 2 secs later... BOOOOOOOOM!!!!! /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

    j
     
  10. wild-will

    wild-will 1/2 ton status

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    Hey jeffro calm down it isnt as dangerous as you think. Why would the guys on trucks put it in there truck if it was so dangerous and plus i have never seen or heard of fatality's or trucks blowin up
     
  11. jeffro

    jeffro 1/2 ton status

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    I Ain't Skeered!! Hell At the bus shop where I work we work with liquified natural gas. Pretty cool stuff. Liquified at 200 something below zero. Kinda cool to play with but you don't want to get much on your skin. It'll freeze-dry you.
     
  12. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    i agree that you dont hear about propane rigs blowing up all the time. At the same time, not to many hardcore 4x4s run propane. As far as being flammable goes, propane is one of the more dangerous gases that are commonly available. If mixed with air in the right proportions and then ignited, say goodnight, cause it wont just be a little flame, it'll be an explosion.

    all of that said, some peeps run it and it seems to work for them so charge on. I wouldnt run it, but thats my rig. On your rig you can run whateva u want. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    j
     
  13. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Maybe not too many rigs use propane, but I've seen some hardcore TTC compeditors that do.

    What kind of carb do you need to use? I checked out the propane site but he got his for free so I'm just not seeing it.
     
  14. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    from what I have heard you get less power. Less mileage. it costs less per gallon but not that much less. Availability is far less especially for a down the highway venture. All things concerned its a bad idea. This is what I have been told. Years ago propane was considerably cheaper which help to offset the mileage loss.
     

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