Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

anyone used those DIY videos for rebuilding transmissions?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by jekbrown, Sep 9, 2004.

  1. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    May 19, 2001
    Posts:
    45,030
    Likes Received:
    363
    Location:
    Vancouver, WA, USA
    I'm thinking of getting the one that covers the TH-400 and trying it out. Plan would be to get a dirt cheap old beater trans and use the vid + some new high end hard parts / rebuild kit stuff to make a kick azz built TH400 to eventually swap into the rig. Tranmissions are one part of my rig that I dont have a dang clue about, and assuming the end result was a solid reliable tranny, it'd be well worth the effort to learn all about 'em.

    from what I understand, special tools for some stuff is required... but its the kind thing where you could take the part you're working on down to the tranny shop and have'm hook ya up for minimal cost...

    so, anyone tried these educational vids?? for that matter, anyone rebuilt their own TH400?

    j
     
  2. MTBLAZER89

    MTBLAZER89 3/4 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2001
    Posts:
    7,272
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Oak Harbor, WA
    A guy I was stationed with in WA learned that way. The first one he did only lasted about 5000 miles, but he has been doing good ever since. I have thought about getting one and the tools then try on a spare tranny and see how it does. I imagine you could mess up once or so and still be ahead on $$$
     
  3. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    May 19, 2001
    Posts:
    45,030
    Likes Received:
    363
    Location:
    Vancouver, WA, USA
    yeah, reading books about stuff like this doesn't do it for me... I dont learn until I tear into it with my own hands/tools. I didn't know anything about t-cases until I had to swap outputs on my np205 and I am glad I did it myself. IMO knowledge about this stuff is worth a lot... even if doing it all yourself and messing up a few times only results in breaking even from a financial point of view.

    j
     
  4. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

    Joined:
    May 30, 2001
    Posts:
    17,669
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    IL, USA
    I agree. Gearboxes are my next thing I need to learn. The rest on these trucks are gravy, but tranny/transfer case combos and the capability to repair them is something that everyone who wants to build a rig on a budget should know. I can pick up broken/crappy gearboxes for next to nothing, and if I could rebuild them, I'd be in good shape.
     
  5. 84gmcjimmy

    84gmcjimmy 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2003
    Posts:
    12,838
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    B.C. CANADA
    I wouldn't mind learning too. I dont alot as it is, but I mind as well keep learning /forums/images/graemlins/woot.gif
     
  6. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2004
    Posts:
    10,877
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sacramento ca
    doing a manual isent hard but i wont touch a auto
     
  7. Nonesuch

    Nonesuch 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2001
    Posts:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin(Leander), TX
    I did my first th400 back in Feb and it was pretty damn easy. You don't need any special tools but a clutch spring compressor does make life easier. I used a book that I picked up at Barnes and Noble( see book ) This book was very helpful and has pretty good pictures. The videos are a bore to watch and unless you have a photographic memory, be prepared to setup a tv/vcr in your work space as you will need to refer back to it frequently.

    I highly recommend rebuilding your own transmission at least once. It is not very difficult but there are lots of things that pro's will see and you won't. Some parts you come across will look good but need to be checked and replaced if out of spec. A good set of measuring calipers and a dial indictor and stand are two tools that I recommend as well as the clutch spring compressor.
     
  8. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Posts:
    3,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC, NY, USA
    My friend gave me a "how to rebuild a T5" video- its acutally quite good. fell asleep watching it, but its definately one of those "HAve a ziplock over your remote to keep it clean while you work on your tranny" kinda thing. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  9. WhiteWhomper

    WhiteWhomper 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2000
    Posts:
    227
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Highlands Ranch, CO.
    The key to doing a TH400 rebuild for the first time is to find an area that is long enough for you to lay everything out in a line exactly as you pull it out. Start with your tranny like on a garage floor and as you pull off the torque converer, lay it the furthest away, then the front pump, and so on then as you get ready to reinstall the parts, you can go and replace each of the clutch packs, etc in each piece and start backwards. Almost always the problems start when you get stuff out of order...otherwise the TH400 is pretty easy to rebuild. A DIY video is still probably not a bad investment to help gain confidence.
     
  10. TorkDSR

    TorkDSR 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2001
    Posts:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    bucks co pa
    i had very good success (read: hasnt busted yet) using a chilton tranny book for my 700. only tool i needed was a set of of feeler gauges. for shimming seals back in.
    and im sure the clutch compressor would be nice, but not necessary if you have a helper for 30 min
     
  11. Nonesuch

    Nonesuch 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2001
    Posts:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin(Leander), TX
    I like the 'use the tranny pan as a parts tray' method. But WhiteWhomper is dead on about laying out the parts in a big area. The most important part on the tranny is the valve body. A lot of the parts in it appear identical but are very different. Make sure not to mis-match the valves in the wrong bore or you will be scratching your head later on.
     

Share This Page