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ATTN: k5james

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Bubba Ray Boudreaux, Nov 26, 2004.

  1. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Border Patrol Agents Handcuffed By Regulations?
    Agents Say Country's Security May Be At Risk

    POSTED: 4:02 p.m. PST November 24, 2004
    UPDATED: 5:02 p.m. PST November 24, 2004

    Story by 10News.com

    SAN DIEGO -- Border Patrol agents say they are being handcuffed by regulations and poor equipment. They're afraid that the country's security could be at risk.

    The world's busiest border crossing got a lot busier last year, 10News reported. About 62 million people crossed into the United States through the crossings at San Ysidro and Otay Mesa last year -- about 2 million more than the year before.

    One reason is an increase in the population of Tijuana and those who commute to San Diego for work.

    Every year, 14 million cars and 40 million people cross the San Ysidro border. It's a security concern, 10News reported.

    Department of Homeland Security Undersecretary Asa Hutchison said, "It's a post 9/11 environment, and there are risks to America."

    Since Sept. 11, 2001, San Ysidro security has tightened significantly.

    Illegals, and possibly those who threaten the country's security, now move across the border in remote areas east of San Diego.

    In remote locations, there are many holes in border security, 10News reported. People who live near those locations say when patrols are on shift changes, illegals by the dozens cross in those lightly-secured areas. They're afraid terrorists could get into the United States too, 10News reported.

    "Our main concern is the protection of the citizens of the United States. We take it seriously," said an anonymous Border Patrol agent.

    Besides the holes, Border Patrol agents say their jobs are getting tougher. They're forced to patrol the long, open stretches using outdated equipment.

    A letter from United States Attorney Carol Lamb's office describes new prosecution guidelines. Under them, criminal aliens caught entering the country can now be freed without facing charges, even with prior convictions for child molestation and terrorism.

    "The guidelines have made it so easy for the criminal element to just come back into the United States that it really has to be addressed," said a Border Patrol agent.

    Hutchinson told 10News that resources are stretched thin.

    "You've got to set priorities based on resources and we'll work with the Department of Justice to make sure they're set in the right way," Hutchinson said.

    But there are more issues, according to 10News.

    Agents have to sign a non-disclosure agreement. Its purpose is to keep them from reporting problems publicly, even if the information is unclassified.

    Signing the agreement means they are not allowed to talk about a policy forcing some agents to leave their assault weapons at the office while they patrol the border, or about having to work the border areas in older vehicles, while their bosses cruise around in new SUVs and Humvees.

    Hutchison, meanwhile, said Washington is doing the best it can.

    "We want to invest in people and in technology and make sure they have what's necessary to get the job done," Hutchinson said.

    But he doesn't want to talk about a chase policy, which border patrol agents say greatly restricts their ability to stop illegal entries and possibly terrorists.

    "The border patrol has to have regulations that have regard for civilian life. Not having chases that would endanger people unnecessarily," Hutchinson said.

    An al-Qaida operative recently arrested in Pakistan said there were talks about moving nuclear materials to Mexico and then into the United States. Agents said they are not concerned about people who are trying to get into the country for jobs to support their families. They said they are worried about the career criminals and possible terrorists.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    You have to be joking? This is reality for you guys?

    /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif
     

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