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axels

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by aaf815, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. aaf815

    aaf815 Registered Member

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    whats the difference between a 14bff and a 14bsf? will a 14b bolt on to the rear of a 85 k5? on which trucks will i find a 14b?an for the front should i stay with a 10b ? dont do much offroad but i want to run 38's will the 10b live?
     
  2. neverendingproject

    neverendingproject 1/2 ton status

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    All 73-87 3/4 ton rear axles will bolt in. A 14ff is stronger than a 14sf but a sf is still plenty strong for most. Do a little searching with the "search" button and you will come up with quite a bit of info.
     
  3. txfiremank5

    txfiremank5 1/2 ton status

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    Like never mentioned, as long as the 14BFF comes out of a 3/4 ton it will bolt right in. If you get it from a 1 ton, the spring perches will need to be moved.

    As for the front. There can be certain aspects that effect longevity of different axles etc. A 10b w/ 38's might survive fine with an open diff. Put a locker in it, and you could be snapping shafts and/or axle joints all over the place. But, it could also depend on the type of wheeling. Playing around in a mud hole can sometimes be much more forgiving than crawling around in rocks etc. Ther are many variables.

    Your probably at the point where you need to sit back and figure out what type of wheeling your going to do, and what types of mods you want. IE: lockers etc. and try to plan your build accordingly. Doing so, will save you a lot of time, money and aggravation. Well .. not so much money saved, but less wasted.. lol.

    Do plenty of reading here on the boards, see what others are doing, and what type of results they have had with it, and try to gleen as much from their good or bad experiences as you can. Once you you have a good basic idea, start to move on it.
     
  4. aaf815

    aaf815 Registered Member

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    for the front it is going to be open. and what kind offroad i do is mostly mud.
     
  5. Masiony

    Masiony 1/2 ton status

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    you could probably get away with your 10b front, and getting a 6 lug 14sf might be the ticket for you. 14ff only come in 8 lug from the factory, but 14sf comes in both 6 and 8.

    the differences are that the sf means semi float and the ff means full float. semi float means that the axle shaft supports the weight of the vehicle, and the bearing rides on the shaft itself. the axle (in this case) is retained by c-clips at the ends of the axles in the diff. when you break an axle, there is nothing to keep the wheel and broken half of the axle in the housing, and it will simply slide out and fall off. but a full float however, the housing is what supports the weight of the vehicle and the axle shafts only transmit the power to the wheels. therefore there is less stress on the shafts themselves. and since the axle bolts to the outside of the hub, if you break one it will stay there. you can actually pull the axle shaft out with out taking the wheel off. typically full floating axles are a stronger heavier duty design.

    the up sides to a 14FF is cost and ease of finding one (not to mention strength). but the down sides are the shear weight (about 700 lbs w/ drums), and lack of ground clearance.
    the upsides to a 14SF is weights less, and you can get them in 6 lug and keep rims already purchased. but the down sides is cost (think $400-600 range), and the fact that they are still a semi float w/ c-clips design.

    BTW, all fronts are full floating.
     
  6. 87BrnRsd

    87BrnRsd 1/2 ton status

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    Your correct on everything, except a 14ff with drums weighs more like 550 lbs. Still a heavy arse sob though.
    -Harrison
     
  7. Masiony

    Masiony 1/2 ton status

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    perhaps it was my front end that weighs 700+.
     
  8. neverendingproject

    neverendingproject 1/2 ton status

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    What ever it is, its gonna feel like 700 if your moving it by yourself. :D
     
  9. Masiony

    Masiony 1/2 ton status

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    yeah, its a 60. tell you what. they (the pair) were fun to get out of the back of my blazer by myself. i did have a cherry picker, but it was still interesting.
     
  10. aaf815

    aaf815 Registered Member

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    how do you tell if the axels is a 14bff or a 14bsf without opening it up?
     
  11. Masiony

    Masiony 1/2 ton status

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    several ways. if it has a big hub in the middle of the wheel, it is full float. also look at the diff cover. this is what a semi float looks like:
    [​IMG]

    this is what a full float looks like:
    [​IMG]
     

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