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Axle Width

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Ozark, Mar 28, 2000.

  1. Ozark

    Ozark Newbie

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    I've just purchased my first K5 last week and I'm already thing of mods. My first question regards the rear axle width. Why is it narrower than the front axle? What can I do to correct this? Would it be okay to install spacers or is this solution too weak? I don't plan on doing any heavy off roading. I purchased this K5 mainly for hunting and bad weather.
     
  2. Cmoe

    Cmoe 1/2 ton status

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    Check the http://coloradok5.com/review.htm of Performance Wheel & Tire Billet Aluminum Wheel Spacers.


    C'moe

    <font color=black>the blazer is "Back in Black"
     
  3. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    I read somewere once that the original idea was that the rear tires wouldn't run the same track or ruts as the fronts and this was suppose to increase traction.
    Does it relly? I don't know!
    Adding spacers to me is just askin for something else to fail! Mabie? mabie not?
    sup to you
    later
    Burt4x4

    Rock ON!
     
  4. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Ohio
    The track width difference is based on the idea that a narrower rear axle will allow better tracking while steering and helps prevent under-steer. As a rough example, think of the old 3 wheeler ATV's in which the rear is obviously much wider than the front. When turned it was pretty easy to either have the front "wash out" or for it to tumble over if the front wheel hooked up. Having the front wider than the rear is kind of the exact opposite of this, but the relatively small difference in width is kind of like a balancing act to achieve the best handling. I very much doubt GM engineers had ruts in mind when doing this.
    For wheel spacers, I've using Colorado K5's old spacers for a while now with no apparent problems. The vehicle has 35" tires and sees mostly serious trails and mud and maybe a couple of hundred miles on the road per month. Speaking of driving in ruts, I had a lot of trouble with the rear end sliding sideways in ruts and wanting to get the vehicle crossed up, the addition of the wheelspacers really seemed to help avoid this.
     

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