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Bed Bob

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by bgchvy79, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. bgchvy79

    bgchvy79 1/2 ton status

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    <font color="black">Aight, I searched for this and came up with nothing. I'm finishing up bobbing my bed, and welding up the bed is kicking my ass, does anybody have any tips or tricks for making vertical welds w/ a 220 stick welder?</font>
     
  2. Resurrection_Joe

    Resurrection_Joe 1 ton status

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    I have medium welding experience, and all I really know is that it's going to be hard. See if you can borrow one of those 120v mig jobs like I have, it'll be a lot easier.
     
  3. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Best bet for sheet, find a MIG and run 0.023 (or 0.030 at most) with 75/25 shield gas.

    Second place for me would be gas welding or brazing, but that’s going to wind up warping if your far from the crown. Heat sink putty (or a helper with wet rags) will help with that though. Depends on how good you are.

    Other than that, the smallest all position rod you can find (other factors depend on what your welding, stress, how clean, etc.) and don't try to lay a bead. It'll be more like spotting or stitching than normal welding.

    [Edit] BTW, Rene (tRusty) is our resident welding expert and an all around great guy. There are also plenty of others (KidJethro for instance) who really know their stuff too.
     
  4. Cmoe

    Cmoe 1/2 ton status

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    TIG would work the best, Second MIG, Braze Third, Stick NEVER..... To thin metal and to messy for body work....
     
  5. rjfguitar

    rjfguitar 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I weld almost every other day on average because I am a mechanic, and fabricator when I have to be. Just get your head and body below the level of where you are welding and point the rod upward and make contact and as the rod starts to melt...use the arc to kind of hold the molten metal up and from dripping and slowly move down making a bead. Try and use a little less power too because keeping the arc the coolest you can will also help the molten metal cool a little faster when your trying to hold it up from dripping.
    You'll get the hang of it. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    If you are serious you can rent a MIG at your local tool supply yard. You could get a TIG but they are akward to use for your first time, and really hard when out of position (such as in body work). This is my .02 I am no pro but have tried it all in a hobby setting.
     
  7. Drey

    Drey 3/4 ton status

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    In my college welding class we welded steel that about as thin as your bed is. We turned the amps way down, used 6013 and has the electrode pointed like this towards the metal

    /[

    actually it was point even more up then that, the key is to get a puddle goin, then GO LIKE HELL. I would go get a some practice metal and practice on it for awhile, it took me about 45-50 min to get the hang of it.

    Those guys are diffinaty right though get a Tig welder.
    When I redid my truck I used a 110 Miller wire welder it worked ok, but you really had to watch about burning holes.
     
  8. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    another thing you can do is burp the weld. That is where you have the welder set so it starts the arc easily when you hit the trigger and then stop. Move and do it again. and again and again and you get the idea. This is with a Mig of course. If you can get a small mig try running .017 wire. That will keep things nice and cool for ya.
     
  9. K1Orion

    K1Orion 1/2 ton status

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    I've used a Snapon welder that belonged to a friend that was capable of someting similiar. Snapon refered to it as "stitch" welding. The welder had infinite speed and heat settings and had a third infinite stitch timer. It allowed you to keep the trigger depressed and the current would start and stay on for the length of time set by the stitch timer. Then it would stop for about a second, enough time to move the gun 1-2" to keep the metal from getting hot, then the current would come on again.

    It was definitely a machine designed for bodywork. 110 volts, gas sheilded, very cool. I would love to have one to replace my Miller130XP, but I can't afford it.

    It might be possible to "stitch" weld with your stick welder. Just turn the heat down and make a little spot weld, then move to another area and make another spot weld. Even with a MIG, its probably not possible to run a continuous bead and not have thin material warp.
     
  10. Sandman

    Sandman 3/4 ton status Author

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    I've welded thin stuff with a stick on 220 but it was a real pain. I had it turned down so much that it was hard to strik the arc and then you have to move fast. A mig would work better.
     
  11. Cmoe

    Cmoe 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Even with a MIG, its probably not possible to run a continuous bead and not have thin material warp.


    [/ QUOTE ] When doing body work it's a must to "Stitch Weld" if you dont want to open up another can of worms due to all the warping that is going to happen if you just try to run one continues bead.

    You can even warp the metal after you finish when you grind down the welds if you don't allow the metal to cool while you grind sown the welds. The best way is to do a stitch pattern on the grinding too.....

    Hope this helps....
     
  12. bgchvy79

    bgchvy79 1/2 ton status

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    My welder also has a setting for an ac/dc welding, would that work better? Also, with that setting I can choose between reverse and regular polarity, does anybody know what reverse polarity accomplishes?
     
  13. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    All the advice you could possibly need is already within all the replies so far. Bottom line is that unless you are desperate, have lots of practice material, and are a glutton for punishment, the stick welder is not for you.

    By far the best welder for the job is a mig welder. The best technique is a staggered stitch. Run a series of 3 or 4 tack welds, then move somewhere that isn't hot and do the same there...keep skipping around until all the tack welds are joined. Buff the high spots off lightly and move on to finish body work from there.

    TIG is a nice process, but can also be tedious in oddball positions and can put even more heat into the panels than MIG unless you're a true pro.

    As for AC/DC and polarity. There are quite a few rods that can be run on AC current. There are also rods that are DC specific...and run best on either DC reverse or DC straight. The best rod for really thin material is probably the 6013, DC straight in a 1/16" size (if you can find it) Amperage is probably going to be somewhere around 35 amps or so...and most likely you will blow nothing but holes in the material anyways.

    Using stick for body welding is like using a 13 lb sledge hammer to type your reply to this post. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Rene
     
  14. bgchvy79

    bgchvy79 1/2 ton status

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    Well, we finished up the welding and we did manage to do it w/ a stick and not warp the bed, it wasn't easy though, we had to stitch it along and then we kinda filled in a little bit in between the stitches, we had to grind and weld several times too. It's still not going to look completely right, but we're bondo-ing it smooth now...btw, I can't remember what size stick we used when welding, but I'll update this post when I get home.

    It's kinda hard to see, but here's a pic of the welds where we shaved my tail lights:
    [​IMG]

    Tonight when I update this, I'll post a pic w/ the bondo on it so ya'll can see how it turned out...

    Ok, this is the best pic I was able to take given the space I had to move around in....
    [​IMG]
     
  15. RustBuket

    RustBuket 1/2 ton status

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    I take it you're not planning on DD this rig? That or you are going to install a different style light elsewhere? Nice work btw.
     
  16. Resurrection_Joe

    Resurrection_Joe 1 ton status

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    Are there holes in there or am I imagining things?
     
  17. bgchvy79

    bgchvy79 1/2 ton status

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    Yea, there are holes, but that's from the stitch welding we did, and also the huge gap in the side of the truck is where we hadn't even started welding that yet. Also, it is going to be my dd if I ever get done, we're building a bumper that will house the taillights and backup lights and all /forums/images/graemlins/woot.gif
     

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