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Best methode of fuel line plumbing

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by COCHEV, Nov 11, 2002.

  1. COCHEV

    COCHEV 1/2 ton status

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    is it best to use as much hard line as you can? or can you use some type of braded steel lines instead. also whats the best type of fittings to use- AN, flared ends or my fave- rubber hose and hose clamps! /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
     
  2. slider

    slider 1/2 ton status

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    I used stainless steel braided hose every where I could. Its spendy but it will last for ever. I hate rubber hoses, metal tubes are ok
     
  3. TX Mudder

    TX Mudder 1/2 ton status

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    braided stainless steel hoses are rubber on the inside, I thought.
    -- Mike
     
  4. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    Steel tubing must have been much cheaper or much safer for automakers to use it as the primary lines for production for so long. I think it is cheap and less likely to get damaged or cut. Short sections of hose with clamps to connect between lines or fittings makes it simplier and easier to connect.
     
  5. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    best is stainless hardline, also most difficult to bend and form
    you want as little flexline as possible as it is a wearing item.

    what you use as flexline depends on your fuel requirements
    does anyone have a tool to form the rubber line retention hmps in hardline?
    if so could you send me the link to a source?
     
  6. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    One other thing I forgot... Secure all lines to something solid like the frame or engine block. I have had tranny cooler lines rub a hole thru them because I didnt anchore them down again. Killed the tranny in the end (when my wife pushed it 400 miles after slipping started...).
     
  7. Ryan B.

    Ryan B. 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I like steel braided lines and AN fittings. If it's good enough to use on all the dragsters and race cars i see, then it should be plenty good for my vehicles.
    I like how its easy to take apart and put back together the AN fittings. I run em for my fuel lines on my car and my blazer. Put em on, check em for leaks, and I haven't had to worry about em for a year since i've done that.

    You only use tefelon tape for NPT- national pipe threads, not for the AN fittings. I've found what works the best is if you tape (electricians tape) where you're going to cut the steel bradied line to keep it from fraying, and get some cable cutters from OSH. They last about 10 cuts. Then you clamp the fitting in a soft jawed vice and work the braided line into it.
    /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif
    HERE's a link to a thread when i was trying to get the braided line and AN fittings to work.
     
  8. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    Hard line is best. Stainless can't be double flared (if you can do it you are a better man then me). I just use regular steel. If I was going to use stainless I would use AN fittings because there are no bouble flares and only 37deg of flare. The only place I like to use rubber is on the low pressure side (the suction side of the pump). There is a reason that the factory ran hard line from the pump to the carb.

    MJ
    I have one of those beed roller tools somewhere. It won't work for the small lines though. Just bigger stuff like radiator size.
    I have thought that using a double flare tool and only doing the 1st step would make a nice beed on the tubing and get rid of the sharp edge. Haven't tried it yet but when I was doing my brake lines it looked like it would work.
     

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