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Braided Brake Line

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by SUB-ZERO, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. SUB-ZERO

    SUB-ZERO 1/2 ton status

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  2. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    Because it's an air line. I would be surprised if it's rated at more than 300-400 psi, and brake systems FAR exceed that. I know it says that it's made out of the same materials as the brake lines they make, but I wouldn't assume that it's made to the same specs. Heck, if you think about it, Dodges and Chevys are made out of the same materials... :tongue1:
     
  3. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Brake systems can easily go to 1200 psi and you want the weakest link in the system to be capable of holding at least twice that. Most -3 brake hoses are rated for 3000 psi.
     
  4. SUB-ZERO

    SUB-ZERO 1/2 ton status

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    Read the article,it is made from braided stainless steel brakeline.
     
  5. resurrected_jimmy

    resurrected_jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    I wouldn't want to deal with replacing it every couple of years when the rubber swells up inside
     
  6. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    Article? I don't see an "article". I see where it says "the same material", but that hardly means anything. I have a spoon made out of stainless steel and rubber, but I wouldn't use it for a brake line. :crazy: That's just their tricky wording designed to give you the impression that it's super strong, but it's still just an airline.
     
  7. SUB-ZERO

    SUB-ZERO 1/2 ton status

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    Here's a little better breakdown.It says its DOT approved brake line that they actually sell as brake line.If it is indeed brake line why not use it as brake line?

    NEWBRAKELINES.jpg
     
  8. 85mudblazin

    85mudblazin 1/2 ton status

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    Why are you trying to convince us that it will work?? If you think it works then get it and find out for yourself. I personally dont try to save a few bucks on BRAKES to get something that might work. :rolleyes:
     
  9. SUB-ZERO

    SUB-ZERO 1/2 ton status

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    Well,I'm not trying to convince anybody or save money(I think it would actually cost a little more than standard replacement hard lines),I was just hoping that maybe someone on here had tried some type of flexible lines that could be routed whereever you wanted instead of where the factory put them.But appearently not.Seemed like a cool idea though.
     
  10. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    i have very similar lines (steel braid + kevlar) in the front of my K5. I got them from Crown Performance. Very very beefy line... if any "soft" line could replace all the lines in a system, these are it. Personally, I think it'd be easier to run a hard line along the frame rails for the rear lines... but the rest of the system could certainly use those types of lines.

    j
     
  11. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Technically if you replaced the hard lines with all soft lines the pedal feel would get mushier since the braided hose is less firm than the steel tubing. From my experience with doing the brake plumbing that way it takes a true road race driver to tell the difference in braking modulation, and at least one of them didn't care. The rest of us can get along fine with it.

    The problem I see in using it on a 4x4 is that it kinks much easier than steel tube. One shot from a wheel-thrown rock and yer done. With the hose out in space it would actually be less of a problem than where the hose is against the side of the frame.
     
  12. SUB-ZERO

    SUB-ZERO 1/2 ton status

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    The mushyness would definately be a problem.Maybe I'll go stainless hardline along the frame and the new hybrid lines from the frame down.However last time I did stainless lines the double flares were a killer on the flaring tool!Air brakes would be cool too.With the failsafe locking like semi's have.More trouble than its worth though.
     
  13. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    I wouldn't be as worried about buldge with these lines, the kevlar/stainless combo makes them much more resistant to that than a factory style rubber hose would be. I have 36" long ones in the front of my K5 and am not worried about buldge at all. Kinking could be a problem and they aren't cheap. Heat resistance won't be as good either since they have a rubbery-plastic outter coating that could melt. That is why I'd go hardline along the frame.

    j
     

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