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Brake hard line questions...

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by txbartman, Jan 17, 2003.

  1. txbartman

    txbartman 1/2 ton status

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    Okay, finishing my 14bFF disc brake conversion. I am tubing now (the original tube was shot). Some questions...

    I figured out the fitting I need is 3/8-24 and need 3/16 tube. I need about 38-40" for each side. What is the advantage os SS versus the regular steel? Is it worth the difference? What about the spring covering? What about buying straight tube versus a coil? What is the advantage of the spring covering? Where can I get all this stuff?

    My local parts stores only seem to have tin-coated steel, no ss. They have the straight lengths with the flares and fittings, but no spring covering. I can get 20' coils of ss from Summit for $25 or so. I can get straight ss hard line from Inline Tube for $18 per 6' length (I would need 2) or $8 per length for regular line. I can get the ss fittings from Inline Tube for $2 a piece. Don't know about the spring over yet.

    Anyway, the price from Summit is reasonable. The prices from Inline Tube seem a bit high. But, I have done everything right on this axle so far, I don't want to scrimp on the hard line just to get it finished. Anybody have suggestions for other sources or alternatives?
     
  2. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    The wrap is there so that when a rock or limb get slapped against the brake line, the tubing doesn't get flattened. NAPA can get you the regular brake line with the steel wire wrap already installed. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif The NAPA store here doesn't keep it in stock, but they can special order it once you know what lengths you need..

    When I replaced the lines on my 14-bolt, I needed to cut down a standard piece of pre-made tubing anyway, so after I had cut one of the ends off of the new tubing I slipped the steel wire wrap from the old brake line onto the new one. Then I put the new fitting back on the new line and double-flared the end at the correct length. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    Other than those 2 pieces that I replaced on the 14-bolt, the stock steel brake lines on my K5 are the ones that were installed at the factory in 1975. So if those can hold up for 28 years, then I really don't see a need to spend megabucks for stainless steel lines. Those are more for the show-car crowd. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  3. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Well I have had to replace several peices and never had a issue with it not having the wrap. Brakeline tends to rot from the inside out. That's a maintaince issue from bad brake fluid that has not been changed enough.
    SS is great but to go SS you have to have adaptors and a special flare tool. SS will not flare the same as steel. The way I look at it is gee the steel last 20 years.....Will I have the truck long enough to ever need to replace it again?
     
  4. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    SS is great but to go SS you have to have adaptors and a special flare tool. SS will not flare the same as steel.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    If you buy straight lengths that might be the case, but go to www.inlinetube.com
    I bought all new lines front to back and they come pre-bent, pre-flared (correct pitch for OEM applications), and have all the correct size fittings with the spring wrap in all the original locations. Basically you take it out of the box, install it, bleed the lines and you're good to go (NO guesswork). Plus it seems like the SS lines they use have a thicker wall (less prone to kinking and flattening) which could prove helpful on the trail. The hardest part is fitting the lines between the motor mounts and the frame as it is a tight fit to get in the factory locations, but well worth it. When I did mine, I also put in a new prop-valve (which they used to carry and I think still do). Brakes aren't something to skimp on.

    Just some food for thought.
     
  5. txbartman

    txbartman 1/2 ton status

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    I agree on the skimoing. There are two things I don't skimp on... steering and brakes. But I also don't want to go to the cleaners.

    I called Inline Tube as detailed components aren't priced on their web page. Pre-bent stainless steel with fittings and spring wrap for both sides of the 14b came to $45. That ain't too bad considering it is all prebent. Locally I couldn't find ANYONE this side of a racing shop that could get me the spring over. And anything from a racing shop is pretty expensive.

    Thanks all!
     

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