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Build up questions?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by thefarside, Jul 17, 2003.

  1. thefarside

    thefarside 1/2 ton status

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    First off I know I am going to catch hell for this but I would like to know anyway.

    Let me fill you in. As you can see in my sig I have an 80' and 86' K5 Blazers. One I have plans to wheel with. While the other I just want to look good, a fluff truck, all show no go. I just could not bring a nice lookin' truck into the woods and beat on it with a clear continence; I could do it with a Ford though nice or a beater. LOL

    I was planning on putting a 10 or 12 inch lift on the fluff truck plus a 3 inch body and some big tires maybe 38" or larger SS Boggers.I am worried that the truck itself could not handle such mods. It has a 10 bolt in front and a 12 bolt in the rear (I think, I really have not looked at it yet). So far I have been mainly concentrating on repairing the body. My main worries were...

    I was worried that the axels could not carry the load.

    As everyone knows with big tired and a lift other problems arise such as pinion angle and gearing issues.

    Any ideas on what I could do to fix the pinion angle?

    Could the stock gears handle all the extra rubber?

    Stopping, could I even do it? Would I have to buy a caliper conversion for the back?

    I am currently considering a 383 stocker to replace the 305. I thought that should be enough power to get the truck moving.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. yeild2me

    yeild2me 1/2 ton status

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    I'll bite....

    If you only want to run 38's on the fluff truck...go with a 6" suspension, 3" body and a slight bit of trimming (which, BTW, may or may not be needed.)

    The axles will carry the "load", but the length of time they do may vary. 38's are pretty hard on 10 bolts...esp rear 10 bolts.


    With a 6" suspension vs. a 10-12" one, these problems are slight and easily fix able. We run into this a lot at the shop. A customer wants tons of leafs and tghinks he's good to go, but the $$$goes up when you start talking about steering, driveline, and stopping issues.

    Disc brakes on the back would be best,but if your braking system was in good shape, you should be"ok" remember, you could always through a 14sf back there!!

    383 should be plenty, but proceed with caution...that extra HP could reek havoc on those weak axles!!

    Hope this helps.

    Rob
     
  3. BlazerGuy

    BlazerGuy 3/4 ton status

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    If the truck will only be used on-road, the axles should hold up fine but they will need to be re-geared...as for the driveline angle problems you could talk to Jesse at High Angle Driveline(members get a discount /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif).
     
  4. thefarside

    thefarside 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    If the truck will only be used on-road, the axles should hold up fine but they will need to be re-geared...as for the driveline angle problems you could talk to Jesse at High Angle Driveline(members get a discount /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif).

    [/ QUOTE ] Sweet, discounts rule! /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  5. thefarside

    thefarside 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I'll bite....

    If you only want to run 38's on the fluff truck...go with a 6" suspension, 3" body and a slight bit of trimming (which, BTW, may or may not be needed.)

    The axles will carry the "load", but the length of time they do may vary. 38's are pretty hard on 10 bolts...esp rear 10 bolts.


    With a 6" suspension vs. a 10-12" one, these problems are slight and easily fix able. We run into this a lot at the shop. A customer wants tons of leafs and tghinks he's good to go, but the $$$goes up when you start talking about steering, driveline, and stopping issues.

    Disc brakes on the back would be best,but if your braking system was in good shape, you should be"ok" remember, you could always through a 14sf back there!!

    383 should be plenty, but proceed with caution...that extra HP could reek havoc on those weak axles!!

    Hope this helps.

    Rob

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I thought about all those points and this is why I was thinking about buying a higher lift.

    Say, I do deicide to make this truck trail or mud worthy. After the initial expense of the lift, tires and all that go with it what would it take to make the truck trail or mud worthy? A set of axles, Dana what ever and a better T-case if a 208 is not up to the task and either way I still will need the new disk brakes. I figured if I go this route that in the long run it could save me money. Buying a new lift and changing all of the steering geometry again to make the truck tail and mud worthy with new hardware would be the price of the 6 inch lift plus the 10 or 12 inch lift depending on which one I pick. If I buy the higher lift from the get go I the changes and financial responsibilities to make the truck trail and mud worthy would be smaller.

    My main worry would most likely axle and braking issues in the beginning.

    Seeing how this truck in the current “fluff” state it would not see a trail; from what I have just read the axles should be ok.

    So now I just have the braking issue left. I believe a 200 dollar disk conversion kit that should fix that.

    Just a thought though. /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif
     
  6. eldon519

    eldon519 1/2 ton status

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    If you decide to make it a trail truck, you don't need to go out and get a 10 or 12" suspension. With that much suspension lift, you probably aren't gonna flex very well and your center of gravity is gonna be really high which will give you a much higher chance of rolling over on trails. You could keep the 6" +3" and get Cut outs if you ever decide you need bigger tires. That would keep the center lower as well as let you avoid alot of nasty steering and driveline issues. If you want more mud then the big suspension lift wouldn't be a bad idea from the start, it's just much more expensive to do correctly. That's my $.02
     

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