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Building a buggy - What type of welding table, frame jig, etc?

Discussion in 'Center Of Gravity' started by PJTPW, Oct 12, 2004.

  1. PJTPW

    PJTPW 1/2 ton status

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    What are the guys that have buggies using as a work base when building a buggy? I've seen everything from parallel railroad track, to welding tables, to adjustable frame jigs.

    Does one type offer more flexability than the others? What has worked for everyone?

    Ryan
     
  2. CK5

    CK5 In my underwear Administrator Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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  3. 85mudblazin

    85mudblazin 1/2 ton status

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    I want one of those /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif
     
  4. willyswanter

    willyswanter 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    [ QUOTE ]
    What are the guys that have buggies using as a work base when building a buggy? I've seen everything from parallel railroad track, to welding tables, to adjustable frame jigs.


    Does one type offer more flexability than the others? What has worked for everyone?

    Ryan

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Scrapping the dodge already /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  5. PJTPW

    PJTPW 1/2 ton status

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    Main Entry: ad·dic·tion
    Pronunciation: &-'dik-sh&n, a-
    Function: noun
    1 : the quality or state of being addicted <addiction to building>
    2 : compulsive need for and use of a habit-forming substance (swampers, low gears, horsepower) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal; broadly : persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be harmful

    I just really like building stuff. I'm already planning a buggy, but it will likely be next spring before I build anything. I'm just getting ideas together right now. I'm thinking something along the lines of Brandon's buggy. We've got similar drivetrains, I just need some coilovers and some more tube. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    And a plasma would be nice. I cut every piece of my truck out with a 4.5" angle grinder. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif

    Ryan
     
  6. rodzzilla

    rodzzilla 1/2 ton status

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    Art Morrison has plans for Drag/Pro Street vehicles that use Plywood and 2x2's nailed down to keep everyting in line.

    You could draw out your lines and put the 2x2's down to guide the tube. This is for a flat bottom frame. You could always make the base and then weld in and dropped mounts later.
     
  7. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    When I worked for the company that built rescue truck bodies out of aluminum tubing, they used a jig that was basically two I beams tied together with some crossmembers. This was leveled prior to construction of each body both side to side and front to back. That's how I would do it. Then you could take some 2" tubes and use them for spacers to set you main frame rails on. This would make it easier to weld tubes to the main rails and so on.
     
  8. marv_springer

    marv_springer 1/2 ton status

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    Ryan,

    The only "jig" I've used is the concrete slab that makes my driveway. A couple of times I drew some chalk lines to help me out.... but mostly it's been a tape measure and the floor. /forums/images/graemlins/doah.gif

    I think if you were planning on producing frames to sell, the time and $$ for a jig would be worth it. For my (up to now) 2 frames that I've made so far, I don't think I could have justified any expense for a jig. /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

    Marv
     
  9. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    I agree with marv. I have done a bit of tube work as well. Most frame jigs are made around a prototype frame anyway. If you are only building one buggy than it will always be a prototype. It can be nice for keeping everything square, but really good measuring and proper welding technique will yeild the same results.

    BTW marvs funbuggy frame is very Intricate to say the least.
     
  10. marv_springer

    marv_springer 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    BTW marvs funbuggy frame is very Intricate to say the least.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Thanks Matt....

    BTW... what do you mean by "intricate".... Is that another word for "bent"... /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif

    Marv
     
  11. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    the original frame design had many multi-plane bends. Those alone can dicourage the building process. (I know this cause the treasure beatle now has a whole different approach to it). As far as it being bent I think if you cut the halo out and winch/tweak it strait it will give up and become a bit more true (not strait).

    Ryan,
    what kind of buggy are you planning on. I do reccomend a square/rectangle base frame (rails & x-members). It is much easier to measure, keep it strait and attatch the cage/suspension/driveline with a flat base.
     
  12. PJTPW

    PJTPW 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for the input guys.

    Most likely a rectangular tube base. I'd thought about all tube for a little more weight savings, but square seems more easy to work with for someone like me that hasn't built a full-on buggy.

    Right now I'm thinking 115-125" wheelbase. Leaning toward 115-120. My truck right now is a little too long for some stuff, but at its weight of 5080 lbs, it helps to have some extra wheel base. In a 4200-4400 pound buggy, 115-120 is close to ideal for Moab. At least the vertical type stuff. Plan on using all my drivetrain, and just transferring everything over so it shouldn't be too terribly expensive.

    Ryan
     
  13. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    I've used two different fixtures for building and repairing. Both are basically flat sheets. One is a super heavy duty flat bed cart about 4 foot by 7 foot. It worked well for little Sports Cars.
    The other I own, it's a 4' x 12' rolling table. 2x3x .250 tube frame on casters. Has cleats & x-members on the inside of the frame perimeter that holds some clear Fir 2x6's laid flat. Those are set flush to the top surface of the frame. Then a 4'x12' piece of 10 gauge is tacked to the frame on top of the 2x's. General idea is that you tack weld braces from critical points (suspension pivots, engine mounts, etc.) to the table's top and build/rebuild from there. When the 4x12 gets too scarred up it becomes tab & bracket mat'l & I order a new sheet of 10 ga.
     
  14. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    When my brother did his Je@P frame with 2x3 tubing, he got 4x8 sheets of ply wood and some aluminum angle. Then screwed the angle on the plywood to make jigs...
     

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