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Building in air tanks....... Please Read

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Seventy4Blazer, Aug 13, 2001.

  1. Seventy4Blazer

    Seventy4Blazer 3/4 ton status

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    Howdy folks,
    I just wanted to say something about building in air tanks. i see and hear about people building thier bumpers and roll cages as air tanks. i do not see this as a good idea. yes it saves space, but it also makes another thing to inspect before any trail. and this just isnt a short inspection. you have to inspect EVERY weld and EVERY bent or area that could be dammaged. it does not cost much for a 5 to 10 gallon air tank that holds 120 psi. i paid 14 dollars for my seven gallon. and it is great. people, if you plan on doing this make sure you have your "air tank" preassure tested.

    in my eyes i feel one should not use this method. you can mount an air tank in areas that are out of the way. under the cab, or on a roof rack. with quick dissconnects you can put it anywhere. just be farefull of how you make your tank if you decide to use the "bumper tank" method.

    Grant Bourne

    1974 Chevy Blazer Cheyanne. but it is on 33's now, with saggy old springs. i am in Yuma Arizona if ya got any parts for me.
     
  2. Seventy4Blazer

    Seventy4Blazer 3/4 ton status

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    Re: Building in air tanks

    top

    1974 Chevy Blazer Cheyanne. but it is on 33's now, with saggy old springs. i am in Yuma Arizona if ya got any parts for me.
     
  3. Kyle89K5

    Kyle89K5 1/2 ton status

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    I fully agree with this. IMHO, when you are using something like a bumper or rollcage for an airtank, you are inviting more problems than you should. The biggest problem I see is moisture. Sure you painted the outside of you bumper/rollcage to keep it from rusting, but what about the inside? Things could be happening on the inside that you will never see until you call upon a bumper/rollcage to save you life and find out that the material has been compromised.

    AGAIN, IMHO, not a good idea.

    Thanks for bringing this up Grant

    Kyle
    89K5
     
  4. laketex

    laketex 3/4 ton status

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    That's what I've always said about rollcage air tanks. Just doesn't make sense. Compressed air creates moisture, which creates rust which eats the metal of that thing that's supposed to save your life. Good idea? yeah sure. I think I'm going to use a air tank out of a big semi truck to store air out of the compressor. Might mount it under hood or where the gas tank used to be with some armor.

    Sherman, Tx
    <font color=red>Come Awn yall...Let's go to LUCHENBACH, TEXAS!!!
    </font color=red>
     
  5. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    You do bring up some very good points. I do have tanks that are made out of my Nurf's. My Nerfs are 4x4 inch box 3/16 inch wall with 1/4 inch plate for the caps. I was VERY carefull about the welding and I made the tank as simple as possible to avoid any extra welds and dealing with bends. With the material thickness I'm using I feel they are safe and they have had the whole weight of the truck dumped on them on several occasions. When I built the tanks a laid them out in my yard with the air line connected to a valve so I didn't have to be anywhere near them when I pressure tested them. Got funny looks from the neighbors when I was tossing a sledge hammer at them to make sure they would hold [​IMG]

    The whole debate about "They must be round" is mis leading. The reason tanks are round is so that you can use a much thinner material to build them. The load will be more evenly distibuted that way. If you use a thick metal such as 3/16 then you can use box but again it's only as good as the quality of weld.
    I normaly store about 140psi in my tanks.
    If your a novice welder you might be best to avoid this style and go with a bought tank as is recomended in the post. If you look around you can find the tanks used on Semi's and tuck them under the truck.
    Thanks for being safety minded and pointing out the dangers. I personaly would never use a cage for a tank. If it failed in the passenger compartment nothing good can come from it. Hearing damage from a sudden discharge is possible not to mention if a peice were to become airborn it could injure you or even the air comming out that rapidly could tear your skin. After all you can cut steel with water if you got enough pressure behind it. You can just as easily tear a hole in your hide with enough pressure.

    It's not my damn planet monkey boy!
    <a target="_blank" href=http://communities.msn.com/OffroadK5s>communities.msn.com/OffroadK5s</a>

    Grim-Reaper
     
  6. Kyle89K5

    Kyle89K5 1/2 ton status

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    Grim, you too bring up good points. Using nerfs as airtanks, in my mind, would be less dangerous than bumpers/cages. A cage should have one purpose. Trying to ask it to do more is not a good idea. For me, same goes for a bumper. If I'm compromising the integrity of my bumper, than how can I safely put a winch to it and expect it to do its job. That too me can also mean life or death. The nerfs however, don't necesarily hold you life unless you are jacking the side of the truck up with them and crawling underneath, another no-no. The worst thing that could happen if they fail under load, is that you'll get some body damage.

    No doubt, that a square box may fit better underneath you truck, but only if made PROPERLY!!! The sheetmetal between the passanger compartment and the ground is not that thick. A rupture in the tank can still cause damage.

    Useing a tank from a semi, is a cheap SAFE way to go, unless you are a VERY competent welder.




    Kyle
    89K5
     
  7. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    I agree! Little tank from a semi is super convenient! I read an article once about an old weld popping the end off an 80 PSI tank, pushing a 4 ton compressor (or 4-ton something, forget now) several inches from the impact! A small break can burst into a big break when air all expands at once. PSI is pounds per square inch... Many square inches makes many pounds...

    Ratch
    <a target="_blank" href=http://k5.8m.com>k5.8m.com</a>
    **Ever stop to think... Then forget to start again?**
     
  8. Pugsley

    Pugsley 1/2 ton status

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    Very true about the passenger compartment - I've seen a 250,000 dollar fire truck with the entire side of the cab torn off from an air tank failing. While this was a 2200 psi bottle, it had enough force to shoot a chunk of fiberglass through the valve cover on the engine. Imagine if the cab had been occupied when the bottle blew.

    Dos mas Tecates!!!
    <a target="_blank" href=http://pugsley.alloffroad.com>pugsley.alloffroad.com</a>
     
  9. rodzzilla

    rodzzilla 1/2 ton status

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    Kind of off the main subject, but one of our fine "Maintenace" people constructed a surge tank for a drilling fixture from 200 psi PVC pipe and glued the end caps on. It worked fine for a couple of months. Then one day I was about 50 ft. from the machine when I heard what sounded like a 12 Guage shotgun blast. The end cap had shattered under pressure. One of my employee's had a coat hanging in the path of the material. It was shredded. We found peices of the cap up to 150 Ft. away. The peices looked like schraptnel(sp?) from a bomb. Luckily no one was in the path of it. About an hour later, the other PVC tanks that they had made were removed.
     
  10. pcorssmit

    pcorssmit 1/2 ton status

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    Filling a tank with compressed air or gas is much more dangerous than filling it with water under pressure. The problem is the amount of energy being stored. This is why a lot of pressure vessel testing is done with water.

    Pete

    '83 K5, 350 TBI (ex 6.2), 700R4, NP208, Dana 60/14 bolt, 4.56s, Detroits, 3" lift, 15-39.5x15 TSLs
    '97 Dodge 2500 4x4 CC LB Sport, Cummins 5 spd
     
  11. 72jim

    72jim 1/2 ton status

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    i heard of useing an old soda fountain can to make a tank from. if you can get one from a resteraunt it looks easy to make. when your done with the tank you can take it in for a refill at a decent price.and correct me if i'm wrong but it takes less co2 to fill up the tires or run tools. a guy at my work used on for about 10 to 15 years with out a problem.

    72 jimmy
     
  12. Rockjunkies

    Rockjunkies 1/2 ton status

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    I am just going to put new seals in the cab, then run my air line into the cab. Think of all the air volume I will have. I am getting light headed now!!!!!!!!!!

    jk

    Keep it simple!
     
  13. KrebsATM02

    KrebsATM02 1/2 ton status

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    hmm well then, i'm building my york compressor bracket tommorow and plumbing lines to my front bumper and rocker knockers. I'm not really worried about anything blowing up, just leaking. I would think that the weld on the end caps would crack instead of blowing off though. All i know is i won't be around of the front of the vehicle when i pressure test it. - Doug

    Doug Krebs
     

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