Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Building rafters for my shed.......

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Can Can, May 31, 2002.

  1. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    136
    Location:
    Cochrane, Alberta, Canada
    I'm far from a woodworking whiz, but I'm in the middle of building my own 6 x 8 shed from scratch. Everything is actually going really well, but I'm ready to build rafters and I'm at a loss.

    1. What angle do you build a roof at?? I'm considering something like a 33' angle.

    2. How do you tie the rafters together once they've been nailed into place? Or does the roof sheeting keep them from wobbling?

    3. How do you finish the cap? Is there a special way to seal the two ends of roof sheeting before putting on shingles?

    Thanks, wood boys!!!/forums/images/icons/wink.gif
     
  2. Stickseler

    Stickseler 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2001
    Posts:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #1 use a 3" pitch min for shingles, Pers. I think 5 or 6" is better, That means that a shed roof that is 6' would rise 3" vert. for each 12" hriz. so 18" high. unless its an A roof then it would be 3' horiz each way about 9" tall.

    #2 Use a rafter-tie or huicane strap where the rafter meets the top plate and tie it all togeter with the roof sheathing, Use plywood clips at the seams between the rafters. If you do an A roof use collar-ties.

    # 3 what cap are you talking about??
     
  3. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    136
    Location:
    Cochrane, Alberta, Canada
    By cap I mean where the two pieces of sheeting meet at the peak of the roof....
     
  4. Stickseler

    Stickseler 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2001
    Posts:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Oh...so your doing an A roof... Thats the ridge. you can either get an aluminum ridge vent (it'll let the hot air out) or you can take a 3 tab shingle and cut them down the tab into 3 pieces and layer them ontop of each other. Hold on Ill go find a pic.
     
  5. Stickseler

    Stickseler 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2001
    Posts:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    <a target="_blank" href=http://popularmechanics.com/popmech/homei/9902HIHIM.html>http://popularmechanics.com/popmech/homei/9902HIHIM.html</a>

    here ya go. kinda basic but it works. If you have other questions ask away. But a midnight I turn into a pumkin and have to go /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  6. Skigirl

    Skigirl 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2001
    Posts:
    2,563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles, California
    Paul, I've built a few. Most recent: one with an A type roof (8'x8'), one with shed roof (6'x16'). The 8'x8' with shingles, the shed roof with roll roofing.

    4 in 12 (4" vertical rise for every 12" of horizontal length) will ensure that water won't pool on your roof. If you use shingles and the roof's too flat, water doesn't run off and can seep under the shingles.

    As for framing, there are so many metal products on the market to attach rafters and such, that building is now really easy. There are even complete kits with connectors that allow you to build an 8'x8' shed without having to cut angles in your 2x4's. If you want, I can take some pics of the angles I've used so you can see how they work. You can buy them at any Home Depot or similar stores.

    Looks like you have a pretty good roofing reference already. But if you have any other questions about caps or whatever, it's pretty easy to do, and I'm sure one of us can walk you thru it. On the undersheeting, overlap them over the cap then staplegun. Run your shingles up to the ridge top, then use individual shingles (as stated, you'll have to cut them) overlapping one with the next by half. It's a good idea to lay your ridge cap in such a direction that when the wind blows it doesn't blow into the shingles so as to lift them. Hope I was clear enough there.
     
  7. Polaris

    Polaris 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Posts:
    1,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Rhinelander, Wisconsin
    If you'd like I can send some pics of our roof in our 10x16 shed. The structure of it is finished, but we still need the roof ends, doors, and shingles. It is very sturdy.
     
  8. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    136
    Location:
    Cochrane, Alberta, Canada
    Thanks for the replies, brothers/sisters.

    I got my wall and floor framed and sheeted yesterday and I'm pretty sure I understand the rafter thing. I found a great site that showed me how to use my square to find the pitch, and I took a look at a friend's roof and I have a good idea of what kind of design I need to use.
     
  9. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    13,055
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Humboldt County, CA
    Hey Paul just so you know and you probably already do most hardware stores have or can get books on stuff like this and trust me they do help. Also I dont know what its like up there but is everything your doing up to code? Would hate to hear that you did all the work for nothing.
     
  10. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    136
    Location:
    Cochrane, Alberta, Canada
    Hmmmmmmmmm......I never thought that building codes would apply to a 6 x 8 shed. I'm not sure that it will really matter, anyway, because I'm going to transport the floor, walls, and rafters out to my property and put it together out there. I'm gonna place it back in the bush so it will be out of sight.

    Just so you know, I framed the floor with 2x6 16" centers, and the wall with 2x4 16" centres. I'm running a double cap and I framed in the door with a double 2x6 header. I sheeted the floor with 5/8 tongue and groove OSB, and the walls and roof with 3/8 OSB. Does that sound right??? . I'm pretty sure it would pass any code that would apply.

    Thanks for the heads up./forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  11. TXBIGFISH

    TXBIGFISH 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Posts:
    297
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sachse TX
    As a building Inspector, yes you do have to get a permit.
    The reason being, set backs need to be checked as well as to make sure it is not sitting over any utility easments and sizing ect. I would really hate for you to build it then have to move it because of location or even worse have to tear it down due to restrictions. The worst that can come of it is citations being issued for every day it is standing after the notice of violation has been issued.
    Just CYA and get a permit, I deal with this on a daily basis.
    Hope this helps.
     
  12. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    13,055
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Humboldt County, CA
    Paul, as far as being built right I have no ideal! I will say this though you sound like your ready for the big huricane to hit Western Canada /forums/images/icons/wink.gif
     

Share This Page