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Can you custom make tapered zero rates?

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by BlueBlazer, Apr 4, 2002.

  1. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    I did a search on this and couldnt come up with anything on here or on your site. I need a pair of zero rate add a leaves, but I also need to shim my pinion down 8 degrees due to a shacle flip. My question is could you take a zero rate and machine a taper into it? How much would it cost if you could? I found a guy who will do this for about 60 bucks plus Id have to get new center pins. If you could do better than this Id definitely go with you over him. I think this is something that a lot of people might be interested in so they can eliminate shims that are just sandwiched in between the pad and leaf, and at the same time get a 1" lift. Thanks in advance
     
  2. JIM88K5

    JIM88K5 1/2 ton status

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    Me too...
    Jim
     
  3. Zepplin

    Zepplin 1/2 ton status

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    Stephen,

    That sure would be nice. You probably have about thousand irons in the fire but, that would compliment the shackle flip quite nicely.
     
  4. Mudzer

    Mudzer 1/2 ton status Author

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    Tyler,

    When Todds Pop was working at the Machine shop, he made several pairs. Pop said its fairly easy.

    These are very cool.
     
  5. 87GMCJimmy

    87GMCJimmy 1/2 ton status

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    I would be interested also!!

    Mike
     
  6. Hossbaby50

    Hossbaby50 3/4 ton status

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    I remember him saying something about he has done them, but doesn't do them very often because he has to set up the machines for the taper, and then has to reset them to the normal blocks which he said was a PITA if i remember right. If there was enough interest you never know though.

    I'm interested too. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  7. K10ANDYKHAMNIC

    K10ANDYKHAMNIC 1/2 ton status

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    im a machinist and it wouldnt be that hard at all , justtime consuming cuz steel is a pain to machine
     
  8. ChadH82

    ChadH82 1/2 ton status

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  9. 2Dogs

    2Dogs 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    If Stephen doesn't do this I know a place that will make degreed shims. I had some made with a 3/8" lift that I welded to my Zero rates.
     
  10. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    They're all pretty much right on, we have done a few and at this point aren't set up to do them in big numbers.
    I should actually say that I don't know what it would cost for us to do custom tapers since it really comes down to shop time. We are short of machine capacity right now but that shouldn't be a permanent problem.

    One thing that we do is put a little flat on them for the head of the center pin to sit on so it's not side loaded, usually extra little touches like that cost a bit more. I'd have to think about it a bit to see if we could do it with the offsets and still make them work with multiple modes. I know you can't turn them around so that rules one mode out.

    Give us a couple weeks to dig the machine out from under the chip pile and we'll see what we can do.
     
  11. 2Dogs

    2Dogs 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Yeah, I had the bolt holes counter sunk and leveled to where the shims work on the bottom of the zero-rate. Real clean but they ran about $40 I think. Good info for you if you start producing them on a custom fit-to-app basis.

    Can we officially name zero-rate-add-a-leaf to ZRAL or something else easy.. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  12. shaggyk5

    shaggyk5 1/2 ton status

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    <blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr>

    Can we officially name zero-rate-add-a-leaf to ZRAL or something else easy..

    <hr></blockquote>


    Most of us are just calling them 0-rates. Easy enuff.
     
  13. thebigdaddyof2

    thebigdaddyof2 1/2 ton status

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    The term Pop used was "spot faced". As Stephen said, this step must be done to allow the center bolt to sit squarely on the O-rate....when cut at an angle.
    When Pop fabbed my 1" thick O-rates, we calculated that I needed 3.5 deg of taper. That doesn't seem like much but the center bolt will not sit squarely if you don't spot face. Aluminum degree shims just downright suck- this is the way to go.
     
  14. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    I did this one time by taking a 2" lift block and cutting it in half at an angle with a box saw. Both blocks were then 1" high in the center, but tapered. Then a little work with a drill let the center bolt go through at the right angle and a litle grinding near the lower opening of the hole allowed the head of the center bolt to rest at the right angle. Then a longer centering bolt went through the tapered block and the spring leafs, tying it all together.

    You could also just take a regular lift block and have a maching shop mill an angle onto it and machine the surface for the head of the bolt.
     

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