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Clinton's Roadless Initiative

Discussion in 'Land Use' started by mudfanatic, Nov 13, 2000.

  1. mudfanatic

    mudfanatic 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Aloha, Oregon
    Clinton\'s Roadless Initiative

    By Theo Stein
    Denver Post Environment Writer

    Nov. 7, 2000 - No matter how the voting goes today, off-road vehicle
    users
    and others who have complained that the government is locking up
    federal
    lands are due to get a bitter pill: President Clinton intends to soon
    announce a final decision on his plan to prohibit road-building in 43
    million
    acres of national forest lands.

    The final environmental-impact statement detailing the proposal "is at
    the
    printers," said Patrick Burns of the Heritage Forests Campaign.

    Local Forest Service officials say they don't know exactly when the
    decision
    will be announced, but they know it will come soon after the election.

    That would allow for a 30-day comment period and presidential
    signature on a
    final rule around Christmas, well in advance of the end of the Clinton

    administration in January.

    The idea that Clinton has enacted his environmental program by
    administrative
    fiat instead of trying to work it through a hostile Republican
    Congress has
    enraged many Western members of the GOP.

    "I'm sure that when all is said and done, you'll see a flurry of
    executive
    orders crammed right down our throats," including the roadless
    initiative,
    said Josh Penry, spokesman for Rep. Scott McInnis, R-Colo.

    The roadless initiative, which would affect 4.3 million acres in
    Colorado,
    generated more than 1 million written comments, four times as many as
    any
    other federal proposal.

    It would ban road building in national forests on specified blocks of
    5,000
    or more acres, an area representing about 2 percent of the nation's
    land
    surface. Exceptions could be made when there's a compelling need to
    protect
    public safety or natural resources.

    The Forest Service says it's taking action now because of the rapid
    loss of
    open space, a maintenance backlog of $8.4 billion on existing roads
    and
    because of public pressure brought by environmentalists. Many of the
    roadless
    blocks are mid-elevation forests that conservation groups have
    targeted for
    future wilderness designation. While supporting the intent of the
    plan,
    environmentalists want the Forest Service to go further by preserving
    blocks
    of 1,000 acres or more, enacting a total ban on logging, drilling or
    mining,
    and eliminating new off-road vehicle routes.

    Colorado isn't a big timber state, so the fight has been carried by
    motorized
    recreationists, who see the initiative as another attempt to kick them
    off
    federal land.

    The policy would not affect any existing trails or routes, however.

    <font color=red>get involved with land issues or lose the land</font color=red>
     
  2. blazen91

    blazen91 1/2 ton status

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    Re: Clinton\'s Roadless Initiative

    You know, I would love to see the homes of these people who are tring to stop logging, just to see how much wood is in their homes as well as what their homes are built out of!!! Being in the building industry, I can safelly say that about 70% of homes are wood(framing, cabinets, doors, ect.) How do they suggjest we build their homes, schools, churches, Seirra Club meeting buildings(sorry for cursing), ect. with out the use of wood, which comes from logging? Steel is a great building material, but it only goes so far. I know most of us are mainly concerned with off-roading, but this is just an issue that chaps my hide. Since Clinton(sorry for cursing, again) building costs, mainly wood, have almost doubled. I can not imagin what would happen if all logging was shut down. I know Washington is a big logging state, any comments from you guys?

    blazen91
    Protect the land FOR the people,
    NOT from the people.
     
  3. mrivan

    mrivan 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Coastal Mts. Or.
    Re: Clinton\'s Roadless Initiative

    Where I live we are surrounded by national forest and blm land The forest service is quick to build roads for the big lumber compaines and quicker yet to shut them to vehicle traffic after the logging is done........
    Mrivan.........
     

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