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clunk in driveline

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Rustbucket, Sep 1, 2002.

  1. Rustbucket

    Rustbucket Registered Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    northeast tennessee
    Hey all, I just went to the woods today,and now I have 2 problems. I've got a 91 blazer with a 350. First it would not stay in 4low, it would pop out over and over again (I think this could be a linkage prob. tell me if that sounds logical). It stays in 4high fine. My next problem is a wierd clunk while in motion. I noticed the slip joint on the front drive shaft is toast, could this cause that? It happens whenever(uphill , downhill, on the gas, off the gas). I hope I don't have to rebuild the transfer case. And here I've always worried about the 10 bolts. By the way, the truck is stock with 33s on it it has the 700r4 trans. thanks for any help with this. Justin
     
  2. Tweetysuarus

    Tweetysuarus 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
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    Try to ajust the linkages and as for the clunk check your slip joints & u-joints.
    Bill
     
  3. 95 Silverado

    95 Silverado 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
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    being a '91 blazer it should have an NP241 transfer case, 4Lo is all the way back on the selector. if the body is flexing or if the engine/trans. is moving around it could be causing the linkage to pull it out of 4Lo. check your engine, transmission and body mounts to be sure there not loose or torn, try using it on a smooth surface where you wouldn't have a lot of flexing, if it still pops out, try adjusting the linkage. if that doesn't help it's probably an internal problem.
     

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