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College automotive course?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by JohnnyFresno, Jul 14, 2002.

  1. JohnnyFresno

    JohnnyFresno 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Clovis, CA
    Well This Fall I plan on taking an automotive course at my local city college they offer the following courses. I was wondering what you all think would be the best for my first class? I belive once your complete the class you receive an ASE certification. I am somewhat sure I want to pursue this as a career.

    List of Courses
    ---------------------------------
    Brakes/Suspension & Steering

    20-week program. Theory, construction, inspection, diagnosis and repair in lubrication, alignment, suspension, steering, brakes, CV joint and RWD/FWD axles.


    Engine Repair

    20-week program. Practical and theoretical training in general engine diagnosis, cylinder heads, valve train, engine block, lubrication and cooling systems.


    Engine Performance/Electrical/Heating and Air Conditioning

    30-week program. Computer controlled vehicles, drivability, electrical, fuel injection and sensor diagnosis, automotive heating and air conditioning. Troubleshooting and repair, working with portable test equipment, engine oscilloscopes and computerized equipment.
    -------------------------------------------
    Thanks
     
  2. gokartergo

    gokartergo 3/4 ton status Staff Member Moderator

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    Location:
    Hollister, CA
    1ST class should be
    Engine Repair

    20-week program. Practical and theoretical training in general engine diagnosis,
    cylinder heads, valve train, engine block, lubrication and cooling systems.

    2nd class:
    Engine Performance/Electrical/Heating and Air Conditioning

    30-week program. Computer controlled vehicles, drivability, electrical, fuel injection and sensor diagnosis,
    automotive heating and air conditioning. Troubleshooting and repair, working with portable test
    equipment, engine oscilloscopes and computerized equipment.

    and 3rd
    Brakes/Suspension & Steering

    20-week program. Theory, construction, inspection, diagnosis and repair in lubrication, alignment,
    suspension, steering, brakes, CV joint and RWD/FWD axles.
     
  3. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    I think the class that will do you the most good is:Engine Performance/Electrical/Heating and Air Conditioning.
    BUT
    If you have never rebuilt an engine or had the brakes/front ends apart. You should plan on taking the other courses also.
    If you are planning a career in auto repair you will need to know it all.
     
  4. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Clearfield Ut.
    In reply to:Thunder


    [/ QUOTE ]If you are planning a career in auto repair you will need to know it all.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Agreed, a tech needs know it all, but as complicated as todays cars/truck are - it's nearly impossible to "master" everthing.
    In our shop, we are broken up into specilized areas. Drivability, Heavy-line/Transmission, Front-end, Trim, Ect.
    Each tech focuses on their area, but they MUST know enough about all other related areas to get the job done effectively.

    If I was to do it all-over again, I would have went into drivability, it's a ruff life but the pay is better and the work is more consistant.
    I would not reccomend going into Heavy-line (engine repair/rebuilding). The current production vehicles are just not breaking down like they used too, they aren't leaking, over-heating, or anything else. Kinda spooky. /forums/images/icons/crazy.gif

    Take the Drivability class last, so it's fresh in your head AND get a job at a dealer.
    Nothing replaces "hands-on" experiance, and if you don't like what you see, you won't wast years of your life going to school for it.
    See if a local dealer has a "mentor" program.
     

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