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Crazy weapon

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by hammermachine, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. hammermachine

    hammermachine 1/2 ton status

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    I saw this on another website, it's wild.

    You can't have a contest to find the most hazardous equipment of all time without including the legendary Davy Crockett -- the tripod-mounted, atomic artillery launcher that inspired Starship Troopers' nuclear bazooka.
    [​IMG]The Davy Crockett came in two flavors, 120mm and 155mm. Both used the same round -- an itty-bitty nuclear warhead, with a yield equal to "only" 10 to 20 tons of TNT (about what took down the Alfred R. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City). Maximum range was 2.5 miles for the bigger model, half that for the mini. Which meant that the Davy's three-man crew would survive the initial atomic blast. If they fired the shell perfectly, that is. Unfortunately, "both recoilless rifles proved to have poor accuracy in testing," Wikipedia notes.
    But even if the Davy's crew managed to make it past the first few seconds of their weapon's firing, they still had to contend with the subsequent radiation. The minimum detonation range for the Davy was 1000 feet. The problem is, the explosion kicked off an "almost instantly lethal radiation dosage (in excess of 10,000 rem) within 500 feet (150 m), and a probably fatal dose (around 600 rem) within a quarter mile (400 meters)."
    The Davy Crockett's warheads were tested twice, in 1962. 2,100 of the things were manufactured and deployed with American armed forces, until the Davy was retired in 1971.
    Got an idea for a "Deadly?" E-mail or post your picks.
     
  2. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    ya think that'd bad.. there were experiments aimed at making a viable atomic grenade. Better make sure to heave that ****er!

    j
     
  3. hammermachine

    hammermachine 1/2 ton status

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    or this one

    The "Deadlies": Killer Rocket Plane (Updated)

    Readers of my book, Weapons Grade will have seen the chapter on technologies which looked promising at the time but which failed to deliver. Perhaps the most lethal example is the German WWII Me163 Komet, a rocket-powered interceptor which is surely a hot contender for The Deadlies.
    [​IMG]
    On paper it looked great; the first plane to break the 1,000 kph (625 mph) barrier, it seemed like the ideal weapon to take on Allied bomber formations. It would be much too fast for the fighter escorts to stop.
    In practice it was the deadliest plane ever built.
    At the heart of the Komet was a rocket motor which mixed oxidising agent (a hydrogen peroxide mixture known as T-stoff) and a fuel (hydrazine hydrate, methyl alcohol, and water, called C-stoff). These were combined explosively. The small motor generated 1,500kg of thrust for an aircraft that only weighed 1,900 Kg, twice the thrust-to-weight ratio of the Me262 jet fighter which was itself considered awesome for the time.
    But it was the sheer variety of ways that it could kill you that made the Komet unique.
    - The controls tended to lock up, leaving the plane going in a straight line. If this happened during the attack dive, the Komet could accelerate to high speed and broke apart. Otherwise, it just ploughed into the ground like a thunderbolt.
    - The exhaust plumbing could crack on take off. A leak into the cockpit would fill the cockpit with steam making vision impossible.
    - T-stoff, concentrated hydrogen peroxide, is a powerful corrosive and the pilot pilot sat between two tanks of it.
    "One pilot did get dissolved by T stoff flowing into the cockpit after the aircraft crashed on take-off and inverted," says DefenseTech reader Pat Flannery.
    - The commonest and cruellest problem was the controlled explosion which drove it. The Komet had a skid rather than wheels, so landings were hard (many pilots suffered back injuries). If there was any fuel left in the tanks, the shock of landing could mix it suddenly, and the returning hero would go up in a fireball.
    Three hundred and seventy Komets were built; they shot down nine Allied bombers between them. About five per cent of the Komets were lost to Allied fire in the air; fifteen per cent were lost due to problems with the controls and hydraulics. The other eighty per cent were victims of explosions.
    No wonder pilot’s nicknamed it “The Devil’s Sled" - a fast ride straight to hell.
     

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