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Crossover Q - do you need a longer spring on the passenger side now?

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by BurbinOR, May 3, 2002.

  1. BurbinOR

    BurbinOR 3/4 ton status

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    The 'pocket' on the trunion cap is overall deeper (by the thickness of the arm) on the new ORD arm..........any need to concern myself about a longer spring?
     
  2. Mr.Chevy4x4

    Mr.Chevy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    I was just pondering this same question the other day. It seems to me that we will have less tension on the king pin bushing than before. I contemplated making a spacer to go between the cap and the spring to make up the difference.
     
  3. 79Beast

    79Beast 1/2 ton status

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    Have you specificly measured? I was under the impression that the new arm is thicker but has a smaller "bulge". The stock cap was thinner, but has a large "bulge".
     
  4. uglychevyZZ4

    uglychevyZZ4 3/4 ton status

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    hey there Xover pro's...whats the advantage of it? whats needed to do it?
     
  5. 79Beast

    79Beast 1/2 ton status

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    The advantages of crossover steering differ based upon how tall your truck is and how you use it. With my 8" Skyjacker and D60 front, crossover tightened my steering up significantly. It was night and day difference keeping it between the lines on the road. The real added bonus is that I can turn all the way to the steering stops either direction. With a 2" drop pitman arm and a 4-6"drop draglink, I could not even come close. I did have to add a power steering cooler, but it was less than $30. what you need depends on which kit you buy, or if you do it yourself, and also your vehicle....IE..front axle. You need a 2wd steering box and power steering cooler. The ORD kit (like I used) will supply a dropped pitman arm, draglink with ends, and new steering arm. The arm will be different if you have a 10bolt or D44 front than if you have a D60. See ORD's webpage for pics and more details.
     
  6. Mobile_Mechanic

    Mobile_Mechanic Registered Member

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    The advantage of x-over steering is the ability to turn your wheels when the front axle is twisted up, When one tire is stuffed and the other is drooping. With the stock steering, the drag link is too short to compensate for the amount of travel of the drivers side of the axle. It maxes out the steering box and you can't turn the wheels any further lef than pointing straight ahead.
    A crossover drag link can compensate for the axle movement with it's length. You can steer left and right when twisted up.
    The parts needed are a 2 wheel drive steering box, dropped pitman arm for that box, a new steering arm for the passenger side knuckle, and a custom drag link to connect everything.
    If you go to the ORD website, he explains it alot better than me.
     
  7. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    If you measure the sheet metal cap on the one side and measure the overall height of our cap you'll find they're the same. Kits that use a "sandwich" type arm use a spacer on top of the spring and utilize the stock sheet metal cap bolted on top of the arm. Ours is built to have fewer parts to it and be able to use a tapered nut to hold it down. We've been accused of overkill before but our well equipped customers and I have very few mechanical failures on the trail. That's one of the keys to having fun 'wheeling, work on the truck at home, not in the woods.
    But at least when I do break stuff it's really good stuff like valvesprings........
     

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