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D60 front rebuild cost

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by CR, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. CR

    CR Registered Member

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    If you found a d60 front axle and it needed rebuilding (gears, locker, seals, brakes,etc.) what would be a reasonable price for the work? This is provided you had the parts already.
     
  2. mudjunkie 82

    mudjunkie 82 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    300-500.
     
  3. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I agree, that is about right for labor.

    You'll be shocked once you add up what it costs to build a good '60.
     
  4. fad2blk99

    fad2blk99 1/2 ton status

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    $300-500 sounds about right. Many repair shops are gonna punish you for not buying the parts from them. And often times they won't guarantee the work if you don’t buy from them.

    Why don’t you try setting them up yourself? Granted D60s aren’t the easiest to set up, but it is a handy skill for hobbyist such as us to have. I’ve setup 4 differentials since tackling my first (a 14 bolt F/F) about a year-and-a-half ago. Let’s just say I’ve saved myself a lot of money learning how to set up gears. You have a good source for help here at CK5!
     
  5. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    When you did your first dana, what did you do for "set up" bearings?
     
  6. 6.2puller

    6.2puller 1/2 ton status

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    I don't agree. If you are only going to set up one of an axle it cannot be a good deal financially to set it up hourself. I have a good 400-500$ in tools to set up Dana axles. By the time you get an in/lb torque wrench, dial indicator on a mag base, micrometer or other method of measuring shims and a set of bearings to hog out for setup bearings you have a lot of money in tools. As a machinist I happen to have most of that stuff prior to setting diffs up but still it gets pricey. I set up all the gears for my club so it pays me back for the tools and gives my members a great deal on set ups. I can't see it being worth while for a one time deal.
    I probably have 1700$ just in parts in my D60 in my Jeep. The bearings and seals and Ujoints add up fast. If you need shafts it gets expensive faster. I started with an empty housing with no knuckles so ......
     
  7. K5MONSTERCHEV

    K5MONSTERCHEV 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    $300-500 sounds about right. Many repair shops are gonna punish you for not buying the parts from them. And often times they won't guarantee the work if you don’t buy from them.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    YEP thats right! In fact this just happenned today. The customer supplies the parts, and they are quite often incorrect. It is very frustrating and hard to get the job done.

    [ QUOTE ]
    Why don’t you try setting them up yourself? Granted D60s aren’t the easiest to set up, but it is a handy skill for hobbyist such as us to have.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    How do you figure? If you have a Spicer gearset, Danas are the best to set up. If you remember where the shims go, Danas usually set up the first time, if not the second, and maybe adjust pinion preload. Its really a piece of cake! /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif

    If I were closer to all you guys, i'd help you out, if needed. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  8. fad2blk99

    fad2blk99 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    When you did your first dana, what did you do for "set up" bearings?

    [/ QUOTE ]
    It’s actually kinda funny... you may remember my post about a bad Powr-lok case. My brand-new bearings (not setup bearings) slipped on and off by hand. I assume this was due to previously spun bearings. I set everything up anyway in hopes of running it that way since it was up front and it would get limited use. Well, it didn't take me long to think better of that idea and just spend $200 on a spool. When I set up my spool, I only had to use one less shim from my Powr-lok setup to obtain a tight preload, .006" backlash, and a good pattern. I guess you could say I got lucky, but I did waste $350 on the used Powr-lok, and it took about 10 attempts to get that bastard setup right. I couldn't imagine trying to do that with tight fitting bearings.

    [ QUOTE ]
    [ QUOTE ]
    Why don’t you try setting them up yourself? Granted D60s aren’t the easiest to set up, but it is a handy skill for hobbyist such as us to have.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    How do you figure? If you have a Spicer gearset, Danas are the best to set up. If you remember where the shims go, Danas usually set up the first time, if not the second, and maybe adjust pinion preload. Its really a piece of cake! /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif

    If I were closer to all you guys, i'd help you out, if needed. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    The 14b F/F is by far the easiest to set up. Pinion depth can be shimmed w/o removing the bearings or altering pinion preload due to its dropout pinion support. With screw-type side adjusters there are no dreaded carrier shims either outside the bearing (like the 10b) or worse yet, inside the bearing (like the D60—that being why I say the 60 isn’t the easiest). Not having a crush sleeve is a relief, but playing with shim stacks to get a good preload isn’t all that fun either. Also, bear in mind; I've been setting up 5.13 gear sets. They aren't even close to stock for most passenger vehicles. In my few cases, the stock setup was a good staring point, but my shim configuration in the end was pretty far from the stock configuration. If I were setting up 3.73s to 4.56s (on there applicable fast and slow cases, of course) it probably wouldn't have been so bad.
     
  9. K5MONSTERCHEV

    K5MONSTERCHEV 1/2 ton status

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    I agree, the 14b ff, 9" and Chrysler 9 1/4" are all easier, but I just meant a Danas not hard at all. I guess it really matter if you have the correct tools.
     
  10. fad2blk99

    fad2blk99 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I don't agree. If you are only going to set up one of an axle it cannot be a good deal financially to set it up hourself. I have a good 400-500$ in tools to set up Dana axles. By the time you get an in/lb torque wrench, dial indicator on a mag base, micrometer or other method of measuring shims and a set of bearings to hog out for setup bearings you have a lot of money in tools. As a machinist I happen to have most of that stuff prior to setting diffs up but still it gets pricey. I set up all the gears for my club so it pays me back for the tools and gives my members a great deal on set ups. I can't see it being worth while for a one time deal.
    I probably have 1700$ just in parts in my D60 in my Jeep. The bearings and seals and Ujoints add up fast. If you need shafts it gets expensive faster. I started with an empty housing with no knuckles so ......

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I got my non-precision stuff from harbor freight, such as my mag base, 50# pull with 3 axis of adjustment plus a fine adjustment for less than $10 (compare to $50+ at a good tool store). I didn't and wouldn't skimp though on the in/lb torque wrench, bearing splitter or the mics (one for measuring shim thickness and the dial indicator to go on the mag base). I bet I don't have the cost of labor to set up one axle in the handful of extra tools I had to get... but I did already have various pullers and a press...
     
  11. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    spindles alone are $150 each
    u joints are what $50 each?
    very easy to drop a grand before you even get into the gears and locker
    I am there right now
     
  12. tomseviltwin

    tomseviltwin 1/2 ton status

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    Strip the axle down completely to the housing and take it to the shop like this. It will save you a ton of labor. Have the shop set up the gears on your locker, and reasemble it yourself. Outside of the gears everything else is easy. Should cost you around $200.
     
  13. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    [ QUOTE ]
    spindles alone are $150 each
    u joints are what $50 each?
    very easy to drop a grand before you even get into the gears and locker
    I am there right now

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I know a good place to get all those parts. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  14. fad2blk99

    fad2blk99 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    spindles alone are $150 each
    u joints are what $50 each?
    very easy to drop a grand before you even get into the gears and locker
    I am there right now

    [/ QUOTE ]
    He said he had all the parts... was just looking for labor costs /forums/images/graemlins/deal.gif
    As far as total cost, mine came to right at 2 grand, not counting the cost of the axle, and I did all the labor myself! Now all that includes 35 spline upgrade, new forged u-joints, wheel bearings, king pin kit, used 5.13s, a Powr-loc (that turn out to be n/g and them i had to plop down more money on a spool /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif), crossover steering, HD tie rod, blah, blah, blah...
    As I said a couple times before... if I had to do it over again, I'd buy a Boyce D60--especially if I wasn't doing the work myself....
     
  15. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    do most of it yourself then.
    even if you don't
    disassemble the housing and get everything hottanked (in a real hottank)
    that will save you hours of thankless labour and the end result will be show quality

    I just the better part of 2 days cleaning the outer parts of mine by hand for paint

    no more Death Wobble thank you very much Tim
    the parts went in over the weekend
     
  16. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Strip the axle down completely to the housing and take it to the shop like this. It will save you a ton of labor. Have the shop set up the gears on your locker, and reasemble it yourself. Outside of the gears everything else is easy. Should cost you around $200.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    ditto ditto ditto. This will not only teach you how to take apart / put back together your new axle, but will save you mad cash. great idea,

    j
     

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