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D60 spring bolt threds stripped out

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by mudhound72, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. mudhound72

    mudhound72 1/2 ton status

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    I went out and bought a blazer with a 60 in the ft, so I could swap it with my 44 and install in my Blazer. Well in the prosses of removing it I found out the stud holes cast in the housing were striped out :mad: BTW it is a Dodge 60 so it uses a 5/8 insted of 9/16 like a Chev.

    So what is a good way to fix this cluster F*** Will a coil insert thred repair work in this issue or wont it hold up. I was told by a few guys it will work and some others say sucks to be you.

    So here I sit on my 1st 60 and I cannot even use the f***ing thing HELP ME !!! :(
     
  2. K5er4Life

    K5er4Life 1/2 ton status

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    Thats about all your gonna be able to do, just helicoil it. A few people around here have done it and I dont think there was really adverse effects on the threads. However it would probably be a good idea to use studs instead of regular bolts since you have to helicoil it, that way you know for sure that you are getting all the threads possible into the housing.
     
  3. DPI

    DPI 1/2 ton status

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    Just drill and tap it to 3/4". You'll have to drill the spring plate too. I had the same problem on one of my holes. I used a fine threaded 3/4" grade eight bolt and have been running it for 3 years.
     
  4. 79k20350

    79k20350 3/4 ton status

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    i wouldnt runa a helicoil on something that has to withstand 140ftlbs. like dpi said id drill it out and tap it bigger. go to a good hardware store (not home depot or lowes) you know, one of those hole in the wall places, they should have some grade 8 3/4" studs. if not just run some bolts. studs definetly reduce the chances of stripping though
     
  5. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Chevy uses 5/8" x 11 bolts. Not sure where you heard that chevy uses 9/16" bolts.
     
  6. DPI

    DPI 1/2 ton status

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    I agree on the studs! Makes findind the correct length much easier!:bow:

    IIRC, there is only 1/2"-3/4" of thread engagement depth, very little anyway, and finding the correct length bolt is a pita...
     
  7. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    link it.

    j
     
  8. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    I've had a helicoil in one of the holes on mine for a couple years now and have never had a problem with it. If you install it correctly it will be as strong or stronger than the original tapped hole. There is at least one major auto manufacturer who uses helicoils for repairs on the assembly line and has tested the setup and it holds up better than the normal drilled and tapped hole.....the only reason they don't do everything that way is because it costs too much.

    I also use grade 8 bolts.......the whole reason it has a helicoil in the first place is because the grade 8 studs snapped off (both studs at different times did this). Again, the bolts have now been installed longer than the studs with no issues. In fact, after talking to ORD they recommended just using bolts.
     
  9. afroman006

    afroman006 1/2 ton status

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    U can booty fab a big ass u-bolt and just forget about the holes. A guy in my club did this and it works fine for him.
     
  10. rustyear

    rustyear Registered Member

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    if you want to do this repair one time only, go with the drill out and tap procedure...go up one size on the bolt diameter, drill to the correct size and tap it...even if you have to buy the bit and tap, its all gonna be under $30 or so...then use studs and some red loctite, which some say may be overkill, but theres a reason most racing motors are studded...it makes for a more solid unit...anyway, this repair will outlast the rest of your truck and its cheap
     
  11. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    I believe you have it backwards. The dodge uses 9/16" and GM uses 5/8. Drill it out and tap to 5/8. The cast is softer and easier to work with too.
     
  12. beater_k20

    beater_k20 Banned

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    and apparently you dont know that reason... :rolleyes:

    the reason to use studs over bolts in a race engine is due to the fact that it will (or should) be torn down MANY more times than a street engine. every time you torque a bolt, and then remove it, you are weakening the threads in the block. with a stud, you dont have to worry about that. if the threads get too sloppy, replace the stud. actual strength has nothing to do with it.
     
  13. mudhound72

    mudhound72 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for all of your replies, I think what I am going to do is helicoil it first with studs and red loctite. It that does not work I will try to go to a 3/4" and it that fails then I will U-bolt it.

    O well nothing is never easy
     
  14. 79k20350

    79k20350 3/4 ton status

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    also studs are a hell of alot easier when lining alot of things up. dude to helicoil it you have to drill and tap it bigger anyways so why bother even using the helicoil?
     
  15. rustyear

    rustyear Registered Member

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    well, no disrespect intended, but using a nut on a stud that is properly seated will allow much more clamping pressure that screwing a bolt into the part...doesnt matter if its metal, wood, or whatever...and yeah, the ability to take it apart and put it together again many times is definitely a benefit...but overall, if you have a part that needs to be clamped solid, using high torque numbers, a stud is the way to go if the application allows it...maybe one of the engineer guys can add their input
     
  16. 79k20350

    79k20350 3/4 ton status

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    any part that was originaly designed to use a bolt from the factory doesnt need a stud. its done for convienance, not to be able to applie massive amounts of force. while i agree a studs should be able to take more force you have to take into consideration things like thread engagement, metals, grades, etc. just becuase you have a stud in a spot where there a bolt doesnt mean you should tighten the crap out of it, theres a reason why factorys put torque spec on things...
     
  17. afroman006

    afroman006 1/2 ton status

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    I think rustyear's point is that a stud will have 100% thread engagement in the hole no matter what while unless a bolt is the exact perfect length, it wont. That in itself would make all the difference. I agree that studs would make things easier to line up too.
     
  18. mudhound72

    mudhound72 1/2 ton status

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    Ok, this morning I picked up a repair kit, I am going to try this first if I screw it up plan "B" is to tap it bigger, if that fails well I guss I will get a big old u-bolt. I am going to use a stud just for the fact I have had better luck with them in the past and it was only $4 for studs,nuts and washers. Also I picked up a bottle of red high strength locktight to make sure it stays put :D

    Thanks again for all of you input
     

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