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Dana 44 Dana 60 Difference ??

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by MudNurI, Jan 1, 2003.

  1. MudNurI

    MudNurI 1/2 ton status

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    Was checking out the technical page here, reading about the differences etc.. figured out I have a

    GM CORPORATE 12-BOLT in the rear-

    but can't tell the difference between a Dana 44 and a Dana 60. Anyway to tell by looking?

    Also- what's a Full floating rear end???

    thanks guys
    Brandy
     
  2. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Dana 60 - Passenger side u-bolt setup is actually only ONE ubolt. There is an upper plate the has 4 holes in it. The u-bolt goes through 2 of them and the other 2 are bolts that screw directly into machined holes in the pumpkin.

    Dana 44 - Uses two conventional u-bolts on passenger side.


    Full floating rear end means that there are bearings on both sides of the axleshaft to support the weight of the truck. Semi-Float designs only have a single bearing....the weakness with the design, is that if the axleshaft ever breaks, there is nothing to hold the wheel on the truck!!!...so the wheel will come off. NOT GOOD.

    The easy way to spot a FF axle is that there is a hub that sticks through the center of the wheel (kinda like how the front ones look) with about 8 bolts in a circular pattern on it. Semi-float axles do not stick through the wheel center.

    /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  3. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    An easy way to ID a Dana 60 is that the steering arm is held on by 4 bolts in a rectangular pattern. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif The steering arm on Dana 44's and 10-bolts is held in place by 3 bolts in an almost straight line. Look closely and you'll see that they form a slight curve. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
     
  4. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Greg has the concept but isn't entirely correct. On a full float differential there are 2 bearings housed in a hub that is attached to the spindle on the differential which supports the weight of the vehicle, the axle is attached to the hub by 8 bolts. Greg is correct that if you break an axle you will not lose your wheel like you would on a semi-float axle design. On the full float design axle the only stress on the axle itself is rotational, on a semi-float axle it is rotational as well as torsional.
     
  5. jackedjimmy350

    jackedjimmy350 1/2 ton status

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    look for kingpins on a 60 /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I look for kingpins too and those HUGE axle u joints. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  7. R72K5

    R72K5 Banned

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    if you have 12 rear then youll have a 44 front
     
  8. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Scott's always got to have the last word!!!! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    OK......fine, Scotts answer is "more better" with respect to the postioning of those bearings in the 14BFF (I should have known that since mine have been apart enough times!).... but tell me Scott, what is the difference between a "rotational force" and a "torsional force"???

    /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
     
  9. SCOTTS_4X

    SCOTTS_4X 1/2 ton status

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    to put it in simple terms greg......a full floating axle bears the weight of the truck on the housing. in this design the axleshaft does nothing more than turn the tire. on a semi-float axle, the axleshaft is actually bearing some of the load alogn with the housing. so in addition to trying to resist getting twisted off, it has to resist getting snapped off at the flange /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    -Scott
     
  10. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> I think Greg knows how it works, just had a hard time describing it. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif ANd of course, had to give Scott [censored] for repeating himself. Rotational and torsional, I'd like to know the difference too. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif </font color>
     
  11. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    So what would you call the "force" of the axleshaft bearing the weight of the truck? /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif


    I can accept that the twisting forces of the axleshaft driving the wheel are "torsional"..... but I'm looking for the term that defines the weight-bearing aspect of the semi-float design.



    ....and just to clarify, I'm pretty sure the word won't be "rotational" which is why I'm poking at Scott (4x4HIGH) for more details. Plus, he tends to always be right and I tend to always be wrong....so if I can actually catch him in a mistake it will be a source of deep personal satisfaction! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  12. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Here is the best explanation available, by the pros at Summers Brothers Inc.

    What are the differences between full-floating and semi-floating axles? The accompanying descriptions point out the advantages and disadvantages of the two designs. Both systems have been used successfully throughout the history of the automobile.

    SEMI-FLOATING
    In this design, the axle shaft is a weight-carrying member. This is a very cost-effective system because the axle performs two functions simultaneously, it transmits the rotating force to the wheel and it supports part of the vehicle's weight. One of the chief advantages of the semi-floating system is that it requires a minimal number of components.
    The semi-floating design has shortcomings, however. If the axle
    breaks outside of the supporting bearing, the wheel will leave the vehicle. Also, the diameter of the single axle bearing may not be large enough to support the weight of the vehicle at all times. The shaft diameter must be proportionally larger at the flange end to prevent bending; this stiff shaft will not cushion the driveline shock loads experienced by the ring and pinion gears.
    In summary, the principal advantages of a semi-floating axle
    are low cost and simplicity.

    FULL-FLOATING
    The full-floating axle system was designed to carry more vehicle weight than a semi-floating axle. This design is used exclusively
    in heavy-duty trucks and racing vehicles. Two tapered roller bearings share the wheel load, instead of the single bearing used in semi-floating systems. The bearings used in full-floating designs are physically larger than the bearings in semi-floating systems, and have a greater load bearing capacity.
    There is no bending force on the axle, only a torsional or twisting force. This means that the axle can be very slender, with a constant shaft diameter (except for
    the end splines). As a result, the axle shaft has high resilience (or torsional wind-up), and it acts like a torsion bar when subjected
    to a load. This cushions the drivetrain, and extends the life of the rearend and differential gears.
    The most important benefit of the full-floating design is that the wheel will not leave the vehicle if the axle fails. The axle can easily be removed, eliminating the need to disconnect the driveshaft when towing the vehicle. Because the axle in a full-floating system is
    not subjected to bending loads, it will not deflect or misalign the differential's spider gears.
    The spindle carries the bending loads in a full-floating system. The spindle is much larger than the axle shaft, and can carry these loads comfortably with its two widely spaced bearings.
    The full-floating axle system offers better performance, reliability, and safety than a semi-floating design. Its only disadvantage is
    its greater cost.
     
  13. TONYP

    TONYP 1/2 ton status

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    uhh, but what about the 12 bolt that started this thread???
     
  14. hardcore_rob

    hardcore_rob 1/2 ton status

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    my dana 60 has a stamp on it that says d60.. i had just assumed that they all were like that.
     
  15. bigjbear

    bigjbear 1 ton status Staff Member Moderator

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    What about it? She didn't ask any questions about the 12B.
     

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