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Diesel Life Expectancy...

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by FastFob, Sep 28, 2002.

  1. FastFob

    FastFob Registered Member

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    How many miles Can a Diesel go before a motor rebuild/Re-Ring?
    I'm thinking about getting a 3/4 Sub with a diesel.
     
  2. jeffro

    jeffro 1/2 ton status

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    Properly maintained, at least 1/4 million.
     
  3. BigBluOx

    BigBluOx 1/2 ton status

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    Ditto... AT LEAST 1/4 million /forums/images/icons/grin.gif /forums/images/icons/grin.gif My last one went in excess of 300,000 before I took it to a 'green' mechanic /forums/images/icons/frown.gif .

    Jon
     
  4. OFFRDK5

    OFFRDK5 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I would say 1/4 million is barely broken in. Don't take yer Diesel to a "green" mechanic. They will make you sorry!!!
     
  5. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Barely broken in my ass, its not like its a Cat or Cummins or one of the big Detroits, what applies to class 8 engines doesnt exactly apply to 6.2s as far as longevity goes no matter how many stories you hear.
     
  6. OFFRDK5

    OFFRDK5 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Why do you compare an engine in a normal driving vehicle to big rigs?
     
  7. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Cause you made the statement that after 250,000 miles its just barely broken in, that statement would be true for a class 8 truck diesel, but definitely not a 6.2.
     
  8. Tybee

    Tybee 1/2 ton status

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    Your one of very few that own a 6.2 that dont like them. Well now your engines f**ked so go spend 5 grand or what ever your going to pay for the cummins to make yourself happy. /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif
     
  9. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Actually it was 2000, about the cost of a Banks Turbo kit for a 6.2.
     
  10. Tybee

    Tybee 1/2 ton status

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    Well thats not to bad.
     
  11. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Actually, I would say that 250k is the halfway mark of a well maintained and well treated 6.2's lifespan. If maintenance isn't the owner's strongpoint I would say you could expect closer to 300k-350k out of the engine.

    To say that at 250k a 6.2 is "barely broken in" is irresponsible and inaccurate. Of course coming from you, such bravado is far from surprising. /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif
     
  12. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

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    I know of several 6.2L engines with over 500,000 miles on them and still running fine. But I don't think that's the typical life-span.

    It all depends completely on how well maintained they were. Most I've dealt with lasted at least 150,000 before needing any service whatsoever, such as injector pumps and injectors. 200,000 + seems to be fairly typical before long block service is required.

    I don't have any idea how many miles are on the engine in my '81. I bought it from a salvage yard. It was locked up due to rust in the cylinders. The yard didn't know why it was pulled. The bearings looked like new. I just honed the cylinders, polished the crank, and put her back together. That was over 60,000 miles ago and she runs better than ever.

    The engine in my K-10 has less than 5000 miles on it after the PO rebuilt it.

    An '86 Suburban 6.2L I used to own had over 130K on the clock and ran perfect.

    Casey
     
  13. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    I agree with most of the guys, maintenance is the key, I bought my van with a 6.2 thinking it would be with me forever, it had less than 100k on it, but unfortunately, the PO had never changed the oil for the 5 years he owned it and he towed a boat with it. Well needless to say when the oil came out it was silver not black, and as expected I pull out the caps and I find no bearings.
    But The blazer that I have had for 2 years and have racked more than 50k on it myself after the PO miantained it pretty well for the 150K he put on it, I would say it's half way through it's life.
    I know from what I have seen that diesels tend to live longer, I guess it's because they are built to take higher pressure and higher temps.
    IceMan
     
  14. calcide

    calcide 1/2 ton status

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    From what I've seen and heard, I would expect a 6.2 to last the same amount of time as a fuel injected gas V8. Even some carbureted gas motors last 300K miles. Late model fuel-injected chevy gas v8s are supposed to last at least 250K miles before overhaul.

    Of course, results will vary. The 6.2 is designed much stronger, but also subjected to more stress (by being a diesel) and used in harsher applications (towing) than a gas 350.

    Like has been said, maintenance is a huge factor. The diesel takes quite a bit more maintenance than a FI gas motor. The oil has to be changed more often, fuel filters need to be changed more often as well. If you compare a 6.2 diesel to a late model gas motor, you will probably be changing out your injection pump about the time the gas motor is replacing it's spark plugs for the first time.
     
  15. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

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    I think Calcide makes an interesting point (or at least alludes to one).

    Owning a 6.2L is very similar to owning a late-model FI truck. You don't have a choke to mess with, no carb systems to foul up, is relatively low-maintenance (when compared to an older carb engine). Remember, these engines are old. In 1982, you had a choice between the 6.2L diesel or one of the gas engines which were all carbureted, and needed lots of maintenance and tune-ups, like spark plugs, timing adjustments, carb adjustments, etc.

    Owning an old 6.2L is like driving a late-model gasser, as far as usability, maintenance, and tune-ups are concerned. However, a 6.2L is much, much cheaper than a new truck, and it gets great mileage to boot!

    A 6.2L is far superior than a carbureted gas engine (in my book). If the options are a an old carbureted gasser, or a 6.2L, I'll choose the 6.2L anyday of the week! Comparing a 6.2L to a late-model gasser, well, that makes the decision harder. Late-model gassers get decent mileage, make lots of power, and are easy to maintain. But I'd still choose the diesel! I love them diesels!

    Casey
     
  16. four_by_ken

    four_by_ken 1/2 ton status

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    Change the oil more often? You saying more often then 3000 miles?

    That doesnt sound right.

    Ken H.
     
  17. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Calcide's right on this one. I change the oil in my 6.2 every 3000 miles MAX. I've read a lot of discussions about 6.2 oil change frequencies, and it seems that GM's factory recommendation isn't good enough.

    I don't care anyway. $25 for a filter and 7 litres of oil is cheap insurance. FWIW, I change the oil in my 305 every 3500 miles. Maybe I could stretch the freqency farther, but why?
     
  18. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    When I was growing up, diesels were supposed to have longer intervals between oil changes than gasoline, but I guess the 6.2l is designed different, maybe they squeezed the most that they could out of the design, and since it's only 7 quarts of oil, I would change often, not like my Perkins that takes 20qts and 2 for the 2 filters for a total of 22 qts per change, which I do at 10k intervals.
    IceMan
     
  19. Muley

    Muley 1/2 ton status

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    I agree with canmoreK5, 3K is the longest you should go before changing the oil. The problem with the oil is that it starts to get carbon deposits in it which will block the oil passages in the block. Changing the oil every 2500 to 3k is the best way to prevent this.

    The other mistake is not using a grade/brand oil that is approved for diesels. You have to look at the SAE code on the bottle. Dello is a good choice. Shell makes another brand that is good, but I can not remember the name. This will also help in fighting the carbon deposits.
     
  20. u2slow

    u2slow 1/2 ton status

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    A viariable that's not being addressed is the host vehicle. Are we talking about a 1/2-ton grocery getter, or a 1-ton crewcab?

    I've only had my diesel for two weeks, but it already makes more sense - at least 50% better mileage (8-10mpg vs. 15mpg) than my 350 TBI crewcab. Both w/4.10's, both with 33's, neither have OD, the crewcab is heavier, but the Burb is auto. The Burb has 268,000km, and the crewcab 132,000km.

    A diesel just seems to make more sense for moving a heavy vehicle.
     

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