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Diesel operating temp question

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by Leadfoot, Dec 27, 2002.

  1. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    The way I understood diesel operation (before direct injection) was that diesels were basic ignition upon compression engines. The high compression would compress and heat the fuel and it would ignite (aided by glowplugs on initial start/warmup). This high compression also created high heat, and I hear about turbo diesels having to watch their exhaust gas temps (pyrometers) to keep them from getting too hot. I also know they use cooling systems to control engine heat.
    My question is, with all this heat, why does it take forever for the heaters in diesel equipped rigs (at least an old 9? Ford 7.3 non-turbo that I used to drive for work, and now my buddies Duromax). The Ford could run all day long on a cold day and the heater really NEVER got hot. It was blowing warm air, but nothing like it's gas equivilent. I'm sure there is a simple answer, could somebody point it out to me....
    TIA
     
  2. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Extra large cooling system, plus I think diesel's run colder unless they're being worked. Have you tried running a partially covered rad in the colder temps. I've seen plenty of the Cummin's trucks running those rad blockers in the winter even here and it doesn't get that cold here...

    Rene
     
  3. DieselDan

    DieselDan 1/2 ton status

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    tRusty is right. Diesels burn very little fuel at idle/low throttle, and produce very little heat unless they are being worked. I used have a diesel VW and I could let it idle for hours during the winter - the temp gauge wouldn't move off COLD. When I lived in northern NH I drove during one of our "cold snaps" -10/-20F and never did get ANY HEAT /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  4. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

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    Like the others said, diesels don't heat up fast when not being worked.

    You sorta answered your own question in your post. The diesels are designed for working hard. The cooling system, exhaust, etc. are all designed to remove heat under peak working conditions. In other words, the radiator and other parts are designed to handle the full load of heat transfer when pulling a large load at full throttle. In a sense, the radiators and other parts are overkill for normal everyday driving, especially in the wintertime. If the truck was designed to just drive around, it would have a much smaller radiator and cooling system.

    My 6.2L warms up really fast. A good quality thermostat does wonders. Keeping the radiator/grill covered is also excellent. I believe the Duramax owner's manual even states to use the grill covers when below 32 degrees, or some other specific temperature that I can't quite remember.

    Casey
     
  5. OFFRDK5

    OFFRDK5 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I have a 160 deg therostat and its really cold. Looking at some nice covers for my grille to keep it warm. Take a look at the big trucks in the area and see how much of their grill they have covered!!!
     

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