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Disc Rotor discussion/opinions needed

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Muddytazz, Jul 3, 2003.

  1. Muddytazz

    Muddytazz 1 ton status

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    Ok, i'm going to have 4 wheel disc brakes here pretty soon on my 75 burb with 3/4ton axles. My burb is going to be mostly a light to moderate trail rig, but mostly DD/tow rig (35' travel trailer).

    What are your opinions/experiences with drilling vent holes in the rotors, like size, quantity, specific patterns work better than others. I need all the info i can get before i decide on whether to do this or not.
     
  2. TONYP

    TONYP 1/2 ton status

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    when you see drilled rotors they are most always solid one, the rotors we use are vented and in some cases the two half's are pressed together...I would look at grooving them and not drilling...
     
  3. Muddytazz

    Muddytazz 1 ton status

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    So your talking about something like this with the fins and not drilling holes?
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Don

    Don 1/2 ton status

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    In my opinion hole's, slot's all that fancy stuff is for race car's or something that brake's hard and need's to keep cool. On a stock Rig that's towing a trailer, the stock rotor's should be fine. Look at all the stocker's that are in use every day, towing anything from a trash hauler trailer to horse trailer's, they seem to work o.k.
     
  5. Muddytazz

    Muddytazz 1 ton status

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    This is why i'm gathering all the info that i can before i even decide if its necessary /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. Confedneck

    Confedneck 3/4 ton status

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    its probably not necessary... but check out performance suspension technologies.... i believe they carry slotted rotors... but if you could add a duct in the front to direct a little more air towards the brakes..that would increase brake life dramatically..
     
  7. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    the slots and drilled are to allow gasses to escape fron between the pads and rotors.
    this is not a problem on street pads so the drilled and slotted thing is purely cosmetic
     
  8. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Mostly second mj's comments and add that slots do have a cleaning action that can 'cut' off any contaminants that might get on the pads.

    Holes = eventual cracks.

    If you really want to step up, look into cryogenically treated rotors. Prob won't be a huge perf gain on the street, more longevity thing.
     
  9. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    In my opinion hole's, slot's all that fancy stuff is for race car's or something that brake's hard and need's to keep cool. On a stock Rig that's towing a trailer, the stock rotor's should be fine. Look at all the stocker's that are in use every day, towing anything from a trash hauler trailer to horse trailer's, they seem to work o.k.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I dunno how much towing you do but being is washington I am sure you have mountains. Going down steep mountains plays hell on brakes. I have one very steep mountain I have to go down a few times a year to set stones in the cemetery at the bottom. Regardless what I do, by the time I get to the bottom My rotors are smokin And this is on a 1 ton ford dually. 4 wheel discs should help this kind of thing as I'm sure my rear drums fade. But the whole way down I gotta pump the brakes while running in 2nd gear. Cooling is VERY important with heavy towing, especially in mountainous terrain, but I would be wary of modifying my own rotors.

    That having been said a 35' trailer should have it's own brakes as well. Keep those maintained and your stock rotors on the burb should be fine.
     
  10. 88Silverado

    88Silverado 1/2 ton status

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    I too have to agree the drilled and/or slotted rotors are for very high performance braking systems. The slotted design are better cuz they leave more material on the rotor as opposed to drilling and as MJ said, they are there to allow the out-gas to escape and prevent spongy or fading with disks. (One main reason drum brakes fade is they get a gas buildup between the shoes and drums. Also the drums can deform (flare) reducing contact area. Disks can also fade from gas buildup, just to a much lesser degree)

    I would suggest a good set of carbon metallic pads. Something similar to the Performance Friction, Raybestos Brute-stop (these are kinda hard on rotors and leave a fair amount of brakedust) or check out Praisedyno.

    I have had very good luck running Performance Friction Z-rated pads on my 3900lb 71 Elky which has modified suspension and has had lots of pretty hard canyon runs with brakes smoking. They have never faded and seem to work better when hot.
     

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