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Does the size of your battery matter?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by DPI, Sep 7, 2003.

  1. DPI

    DPI 1/2 ton status

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    I am looking at batteries to power a 12 Vdc motor in my garage and want to know if size matters.
    I can get a very large 12 v battery from Sam's wholesale for under $100. This is a commercial duty, tractor battery. It is rated @ 1300 CCA and about 105 amps per hour. However, they have a deep cycle battery that is rated @ 995 CCA and 165 amps per hour?

    Is a bigger battery better? Will it last long to charge and drain several times a month? Will it hold a charge longer than the deep cycle?
     
  2. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> IIRC, the deep cycle is just able to handle deep discharges better and not wear out because of it. The normal battery does not like to be deeply discharged and recharged over and over again. </font>
     
  3. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Deep cycle batteries are designed to be drained and recharged time after time, regular automotive batteries are not designed for that and will give out quickly given those circumstances
     
  4. 75-K5

    75-K5 3/4 ton status

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    If you're going to power a motor with it then it's probably going to get drained often without immediately recharging, so I would go with the deep cycle. This way you can run it until it's dead, then recharge it overnight without worrying about wearing it out.
     
  5. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    You should be using a deep cycle battery for your application for 2 reasons:

    A. Like the others said above, deep cycle batteries are designed to be drained and recharged many times over their service life. A car battery will stop accepting charge after being drained only a few times.

    B. Deep cycle batteries are designed to put out 12 volts as long as possible and then die quickly. A car battery's output will slowly drop from 12 volts down to 0 as it dies. This causes problems if you require a steady 12 volts to run your stuff.

    I've also seen guys run two 6 volt deep cycle batteries together to get the 12 volts needed. For some reason I've heard that's better than running a single 12 volt deep cycle. Sorry, I'm not sure why. I'm sure it has something to do with the total available power.

    Hope that helps, brother. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. DPI

    DPI 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for the information and comments.
    I was leaning towards the deeps cycle and you guys pretty much glinched it. The reason I was asking is, the tractor batteries I was looking at are about the size of 3 of the deep cycle batteries put together.. They are not a normal car battery. I think the deep cycle is the way to go and maybe even the dual 6 volt batteries like golf carts use would be a better idea. Thanks again!
    dp
     
  7. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    The reason why people do 2 6v instead of a single 12v is that depending on application, it may be more efficient. General rule of thumb for deep cycle batteries is that it can have a maximum discharge of 25% of rated capacity per hour. You can get more out of it, but folks say that you hurt the battery. Even deep cycle batteries, your not supposed to run totally dead. The sooner you can charge it up, the better it is for the battery.

    So that giant battery is gonna be your best bet. Just hook it up to a nice automatic charger, and you'll be good to go.
     
  8. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) is important when you're drawing a LOT of current from a battery, such as starting the engine or running a winch. The other spec is amp hours, not amps per hour. It's a measure of how much power the battery can provide over a long period of time.

    The "big" battery that you're looking at is rated to provide 105 amp hours which means that it can provide 1 amp of current for 105 hours. The "smaller" deep discharge battery can provide 1 amp of current for 165 hours. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif The deep discharge battery is designed to provide smaller currents over longer periods of time. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif

    So if your bender uses 40 amps of current, the deep discharge battery would be able to keep it running for 165 (amp hours) / 40 (amps) =4.125 hours of continuous use. That would be a LOT of bending over the course of a day.
     
  9. DPI

    DPI 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for the technical lesson! I learned something new today! That is what I was looking for. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     

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