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Doubler Cross member

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by TheGeneral, Jan 17, 2002.

  1. TheGeneral

    TheGeneral 1/2 ton status

    Feb 22, 2001
    Likes Received:
    NC, USA
    Steve, or those with the knowledge. Doubler is in and now new shafts. Question is, how high should I mount the crossmember. I have only mounted the rear one (welded in some 1.5 X 4 1/4" thick tubing to extend crossmember for this) Question is, I used to have my 241 lowered, should I do this now also or mount the crossmember up to frame. I have the dual CV's front rear and angles are good, but main question is that I forgot the original angle of engine/trans. If I remember correctly it sloped down a little as it went to rear. My trans pan is level as it sits now (1" spacers in between frame and crossmember), so am I hurting anything to get rid of the 1" spacers. I have the clearance between the fan and raditor and lower crank pulley and engine crossmember, but now the trans pan would be 2 degrees sloping towards front. Obviously, I would like to mount the crossmember up tight as possible, but don't want mess anything up. Any advice would be appreciated.

    If you ain't hurt, you ain't playin' hard enough.

    The General
  2. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

    Sep 15, 2000
    Likes Received:
    Carbondale Colorado
    I think my drivetrain started around 5 degrees down, that's pretty rough since ride height and all that messes with the angle but it's going to be in the ballpark. In your case, I'd build it around the rear CV joint. Tuck it as high as it can handle. The motor and trans aren't going to care about the angle so the big thing I think is the CV angle. You could stick a factory crossmember on the NP203 foot to get a feel for where it would be stock, but it doesn't matter a lot when you're starting where you are. Keep the driveshaft happy is the best advice I have at this point.

    Making the world better, one truck at a time.
    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.offroaddesign.com>www.offroaddesign.com</a>

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