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Drill bits for metal??

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by ChevyCaGal, Mar 25, 2001.

  1. ChevyCaGal

    ChevyCaGal 3/4 ton status

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    I have to drill to put on my nerf bars. I think cobalt is the best to get bit wise to do this in metal? What kind of bits do you guys use (brand/type) and recommend? I want something that'll work without the bit dulling or shattering within a few minutes of starting. I'd hate to drop $15 on a bit only to have it turn out to be a waste of money....thanks in advanced!! :-)

    "I love the sound rice burners make when ya run over them"
     
  2. '73 K5

    '73 K5 1/2 ton status

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    Craftsman bits are great. Even the cheaper just regular black ones. Above all else be sure to use either a tap and drill bit lube or WD-40 on the drill bit to keep it clean and lubed up. Don't let the bit get too hot and it'll last a long time.

    '73 K5
    Chevy good...Ford bad
     
  3. 87 mid canada k5

    87 mid canada k5 1/2 ton status

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    I'd have to agree with 73 you'd probably be better off with the cheaper bits, we use cobalt at work but usually on titanium or other hard alloys regular bits should do fine. High speed for soft metals, slow for harder ones.

    Denis
     
  4. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    I'm using the bits they sell at Home Depot. Seem to do good and the dumb people at the return line don't give me any grief when I walk in with one thrashed and the original package that say's life time warranty and exhange them.
    Like the others said Lubrication makes them last a lot longer. WD40 is ok but I like to use a bit thicker oil that will do better with the heat. WD40 will vaporise pretty quick once heated. There are special lubricants for cutting and drilling but you got to look for them. I use air tool oil (comes in a squirt bottle so it's handy) most of the time since I ran out of the real deal. Seems to work fine.

    Diging it in the dirt with my K5's
    Grim-Reaper
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  5. Blaze

    Blaze 1/2 ton status

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    I use Black and Decker bits. I have a set (or half a set now!) that will drill through metal extremely fast. They are called torpedo bits. I bought them, but now I can find them anywhere. They will drill through 20-gauge sheetmetal in less than a second. I love em.

    [​IMG]<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www4.ncsu.edu/~brschoch>http://www4.ncsu.edu/~brschoch</A>
    My truck beat up your SUV
     
  6. Butch

    Butch 1/2 ton status

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    The biggest thing that makes a drill bit drill fast and last long is getting a split point bit. They make them in various degrees of angle with 156 degree being the best. Good bits do cost money, but after using Chicago Lathrobe bits I would never go back to any store bought bits. Also if you are drilling a big diameter hole make sure you use a smaller bit first to make a pilot hole so you dont burn the tip off of the big bit.

    I thought I was wrong once,
    but I was mistaken
     
  7. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    I used chainsaw bar & chain oil when I drilled my frame for towhooks, because it was handy. Worked pretty well, too; didn't spin off easy or burn off quick.
    I use Craftsman cobalt bits and I usually use thread cutting fluid for lube.
    Remember to spin a bigger bit slower, especially in hard metal (like the framerails), and take frequent breaks to cool the bit and the drill.

    [​IMG] Semper Maintenance!
     
  8. 90K5

    90K5 1/2 ton status

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    i use titanium when drilling through metal...or else 3 regular bits per hole...

    90K5

    See my truck at <A target="_blank" HREF=http://albums.photopoint.com/j/Albumindex?u=1329584&a=9886502>http://albums.photopoint.com/j/Albumindex?u=1329584&a=9886502</A>
     
  9. muddin4fun

    muddin4fun 3/4 ton status

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    If I'm drilling through some thick hard metal, then I get the good ones (colbalt). Otherwise I use the store bought brand cause I'm bad about loosing them. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://muddin4fun.coloradok5.com>http://muddin4fun.coloradok5.com</A>
     
  10. ftn96

    ftn96 1/2 ton status

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    Dont waste your money on those fancy bits. They all wear out. Like Grimmy said, get the cheap ones with the lifetime.
    And for lube I have always used diff gear lube.

    Will work for beer, parts and tools.
    90 Jimmy 350TBI-700R4-241-33" BFGs-10 bolts w/4.10's
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  11. Boss

    Boss 1/2 ton status Author

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    I bought a set of Craftsman Titanium drill bits for like $90 (expensive [​IMG])
    But they work pretty good. I do agree with frequent breaks and lubing it up. I learned the hard way. I think I ruined like 4 or 5 bits in the set. Pisses me off.
    Another good thing is drill the hole with a smaller bit first and then finish it off with the correct size. It'll be easier on the larger bits which are more costly. I'm thinking of getting a drill bit sharpener, but don't know how good they really work.
    Boss

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  12. fr8train

    fr8train 1/2 ton status

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    Boss if you come back to the shop we can show you how to resharpen your bits on a bench grinder.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. steve85fla

    steve85fla Registered Member

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    If you don't overspeed the drill and use some kind of oil you can save the money and use high-speed steel bits. Cobalt is great, but for one use I wouldn't buy them.
     
  14. Stoopalini

    Stoopalini 1/2 ton status

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    I used a solid titanium bit (~15$) with come cutting oil (~4$) to drill out the frame holes for my shackle flip.

    At first, I used some titanium coated bits (they were just laying around) and they either broke, or dulled right out.

    Like everyone else said, go very slow and keep it cool by adding the cutting/drilling oil. As long as you see metal flying, then that's as fast as you need to go; just be patient.

    Thomas.

    -- '84 K5 Blazer --
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