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drive shaft help

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by adamforsythe, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. adamforsythe

    adamforsythe 1/2 ton status

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    Hello,
    I am going to be buying new shafts for my k5 blazer what should my custom shafts be built with?
    Composite, Aluminum, Hybrid, Steel
    Thanks
    Adam
     
  2. adamforsythe

    adamforsythe 1/2 ton status

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    Hello,
    What is the length of the back and front shafts for a 1985 K5 Blazer with a stock rear end no lift and a th350-np205 combo?
    Thanks
    Adam
     
  3. pvfjr

    pvfjr 1/2 ton status

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    I think most of the alternative materials are made mostly for racing applications, to cut down on weight. I would just go with steel.
     
  4. adamforsythe

    adamforsythe 1/2 ton status

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    Hello,
    Thats kinda what I was thinking.
    Thanks
    Adam

     
  5. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    My understanding of driveshaft making is that you need to get u-joints at both ends (unless your 205 is a slip yoke, then I have NO clue) and measure from the center of each cap. The driveline shop then figures all the rest out.

    It is MUCH cheaper to go to the driveline shop with pieces they can use, at least half price around here. Need yoke(s) and the slip section if not a slip yoke t-case.

    As to material, there is nothing inherently wrong with AL or carbon fiber shafts, both have been used in stock and non-stock applications with no problem. However, I would be pretty leery of the aluminum if I had ANY potential of hitting it with anything like a rock or tree. Thin steel probably isn't much better for impact, it doesn't take much to weaken a shaft, but it would still be better than aluminum. As a for instance, I don't believe any of the light duty trucks (at least) ever used an aluminum shaft, but I've seen carbon fiber. Probably extremely expensive to have either made, compared to steel.
     

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