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Driveline Angle adjustment....?

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by NAUBlazer, Dec 8, 2002.

  1. NAUBlazer

    NAUBlazer Registered Member

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    I have a 4" lift and 33's on my K5 and my driveshafts seem like they're pretty steep. I was wondering what you do to adjust these? I've been looking around be haven't gotten a good answer. Does ORD make something for this? Any info would be great!
    --Adam
     
  2. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> Steep drivelines are the nature of the beast in a lifted truck. Question - are you fixing a problem that doesn't exist? Are you going through u-joints real fast? Do you have strange vibrations at certain speeds? The only way to make the drivelines less steep is to yank the lift off. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif</font color>
     
  3. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    Shaggy is pretty much right on, there's not much to do to bring the angles down. Check out Tom Wood's Custom Driveshafts website, they have some info on what angles you should have to make your driveshafts work the best.
     
  4. NAUBlazer

    NAUBlazer Registered Member

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    Thanks guys. I wasn't sure. It just seems like my angles are pretty steep compared to some of the trucks i look at on the site that have much bigger lifts. Is there something you can do to lower or rotate the t-case? I thought I saw somethin about that...I'll try to get pics to show what i'm talkin about. Thanks again for the responses!
    --Adam /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  5. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> I ask again - Do you have a problem that you are tying to fix, or are you worried just because you think it looks steep? Also, make sure you're comparing apples to apples. The driveline in a pickup will not be as steep because of the longer wheelbase.</font color>
     
  6. NAUBlazer

    NAUBlazer Registered Member

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    I have gone through a couple U-joints, and it does vibrate at about 20-25 mph. Would a new drive shaft help to fix this problem? What things would I have to look at for measuring for a new one? I'm actually comparing with other 1/2 ton Blazers i see on website's as far as the angles....maybe i'm just making a big deal of nothin...Thanks for the responses
    --Adam
     
  7. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    There are MANY things that can cause a driveline vibration or wear problem, every component from the transfer case to the pinion gear can cause problems.

    But on a lifted K5 it's a pretty safe bet that you have too much angle on the driveshaft somewhere or the angles are not matched up. I was never able to get my K5 to run to my satisfaction with anything more than about 3" of lift with 3.73 gears and 33" tires. Anything worse than that and I needed a CV jointed rear shaft.

    Start measuring everyting, you're on the right track to get it sorted out.
     
  8. Muddytazz

    Muddytazz 1 ton status

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    This is a response I received via email from Tom Woods Driveline, I'm trying to deal with a similar problem, maybe this will help.

    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Jeff:

    Measure the slope of the drive shaft by putting your protractor directly on the drive shaft. To determine the slope of the pinion, look at the differential on the inspection cover side. Just to the right &amp; left of the inspection cover you will see a flat machined surface. This surface will be perpendicular to the center line of the pinion. the difference between these two will be the net joint angle. Call this (J)Example: Drive shaft slope 15 degrees pinion slope 5 degrees = 10 degree joint angle.

    Next you'll need to measure the length of the drive shaft front center of CV assembly to the center of the joint at the differential end. Call this dimension (A) Then measure the length of the differential from the center of the axle tube to the center of the Universal joint at the differential end. Call this dimension (B)

    Now you have some hard #s to work with here is the formula:

    A/A+B X JA = Shim

    Example if your drive shaft were 24" and your differential were 12" and your joint angle is 10 degrees

    A(24) Divided by A+B(36) = .666 .666 X JA(10)=.666(SHIM)

    Whatever number you come up with round down to the nearest whole number.

    In this example you would use 6 degrees of shim rather than 7

    Be aware that shimming the front differential can adversely affect the steering geometry. And We believe that it is far more important to be able to steer straight than to keep your hubs engaged at a high speed.

    Thank You,
    Tom Wood
    Tom Wood's Custom Drive Shafts Inc.
     
  9. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    This looks like a good formula, mostly for short rigs. In a longer wheelbase your driveshaft length starts to make the pinion look pretty short so you can just use the difference between them to correct it, but it's good to use this for a K5.
     
  10. Muddytazz

    Muddytazz 1 ton status

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    Stephen, how would you do this for a burb?
     

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