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Drying firewood with laundry dryer exhaust?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by newyorkin, Sep 17, 2005.

  1. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    I'm just thinking... I can stack my firewood right by the dryer exhaust on the side of my house and get a pretty good flow around it.

    But I'm wondering, would that air be too moist? I'm thinking it would be great because it's warm, but maybe it would be bad becuase it's pulling water out of the clothes??
     
  2. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    Or maybe...start a fire you don't want?
     
  3. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    a good way to dry out wood, (as in wood that is freshly cut not wet from water)

    is to stack it in a livestock tank and cover it all with water, the water will dilute the sap and stuff in side and after a week or two you remove it and the water in the wood will evaporate quicker.

    the dryer vent seems to be a good idea, the air will only be REALLy moist at the begining then will dry out some.

    maybe use the exaust from you furness or hot water heater if it dont work, or make two stacks, one by the vent one not and see
     
  4. Ruthven13

    Ruthven13 1/2 ton status

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    I would think that the dryer vent would have too much moisture in it.
     
  5. hi pinion

    hi pinion 3/4 ton status

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    Just put the wood in the dryer :D
     
  6. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Better make sure that its very well ventilated or you may end up causing problems with your dryer.
     
  7. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    too moist...

    I'd say its too moist--I put my hands under our dryer vent while it was running one day when they were frozen from shoveling snow,and they actually iced up after I walked away !..it was like "steam" heat..I notice the stray cats like to snuggle up near it when its cold!..but I think you need a dryer form of heat to force wood to dry faster..

    A better use for the "wasted" heat would be to add a filter to the hose,and leave it inside the house--it will add humidity and heat to the basement!.. :laugh:

    If you dont mind running the dryer without any clothes is it,it might be dry enough that way to dry wood,but its an expensive way to do it--A friend tried using an old dryer as a heat source for his garage--his mom flipped when she got the electric bill! :haha: --it was like 50 bucks for a week! :eek1:

    Just dont put logs in the dryer!! :rolleyes: --I can hear it now--THUD! CLANK! WHAMP!--"What are you DOING??" :eek1:
    ---"Drying firewood!" :D :haha: :haha:

    I used to have a wood stove that was 2 -55 gallon drums stacked on top of each other,connected with a short stovepipe--the top barrel had a smaller 30 gallon drum mounted inside the other one,all the smoke and heat went around the outside of the inner barrel-(inner one was sealed from the outer)--it had a chimney cleanout door in the smaller barrel,you could use it as an oven or firewood dryer--it worked great,I regret selling it,I might make another one like it this winter..it was great for heating stuff up or even making soup or meals!.I even dried wet gloves in it with a wire rack in it a few times!..(had to keep a close eye on them though! :rolleyes: )..

    I only sold it because my flue connection in my shop was too close to the floor,about 2' lower than the stovepipe coming out of the top barrel--and using elbows and pipe to "lower" it enough to conect with the chimney killed the draft enough to make it puff back and burn too slow..it only worked good on calm days with no wind..if I make another one,it will have to be "low profile"...the one I sold had fairly tall legs..--looking back,I should have just cut the legs shorter :doah: --but I was offered 100 bucks for it,and I had other "barrel" stoves,so I sold it.. :crazy:
     
  8. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    Well, I restacked it and opted not to use the dryer vent. I guess at this point I'll just cover it with a clear tarp, or maybe frame something up and drop a tarp over the top/front/back so air can flow through it.
     
  9. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

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    Ratch just leave the wood outside and don't worry about it. Wet wood last longer, dry wood burns up to fast.
     
  10. vtblazer

    vtblazer 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Corey, your just kidding, right? :eek1:

    Never burn wet/unseasoned wood in a wood stove unless it's absolutely necessary.
    You get way more B.T.U.'s from dry wood anyway.

    newyorkin, just stack it outside with good air flow all around and only cover the top of the pile if at all, don't wrap it in plastic.

    You'll be surprised how fast the ends will check up.
     
  11. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    VERY BAD IDEA!
    I did this a few winters ago, thinking a warm basement would help lower my heating bill. Hard to say whether I spent less on oil, but I sure did have to throw a lot of stuff away because mildew grew all over it. Mildew likes warm, moist places to grow, and I made one for it... my entire freakin' basement.
    Don't make that mistake.
     
  12. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    I just read almost that exact scenario literally 2 minutes ago doing a little internet research on that...
     
  13. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    oh well..

    I guess it goes to show that NOTHING you get for free is without some sort of cost..I thought up her in the northeast,where winter air is dry it would not be a big deal..our basement is damp in the warmer months,but its dry as a bone during the winter--I get a bloody nose sometimes its so dry..

    Guess I'll let the hot moist air blow outside!!..seems like a waste though..maybe you could pipe it into a small greenhouse!. bet the plants would like it..:haha:
     
  14. vtblazer

    vtblazer 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Fairly common practice around here also (VT) to vent indoors/basement in the winter, see it done all the time without issue.

    Maybe it depends on the amount of time that the dryer actually runs pumping moist air into the area... :dunno:
     

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