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Electric Fuel Pumps

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by HispanicPanic, Mar 21, 2001.

  1. HispanicPanic

    HispanicPanic 1/2 ton status

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    hey guys it's me Lpasotx just changed my user name ok heres my question today i went out fourwheeling and my damn fuel pump started vapor locking on me so i got a rag and wet it then wrapped it around the fuel pump and drove home so i started thinking what electric fuel pump do i buy for a 75 jimmy that didnt come with an electric pump thanx for any help
     
  2. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    If your fuel pump is "vapor locking" then you have another problem. Mechanical fuel pumps have been used for probably 100 years or so, and if there was a major problem with them, you would not typically get 100,000 miles out of them.

    Now that that is taken care of, how is your fuel routed? How about float level? Running a pressure regulator? Wet rag means nothing, because just sitting, the vehicle will start to cool off. Amazing what just 5 minutes will do for some engine components to cool off.

    I went through some crap with an electric fuel pump, using it because the mechanical was assumed to be the problem. Long story short, electric pump came back out, mechanical back in, no problems anymore.



    Dorian
    My K5 and Chev/Olds tech/links page: <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html>http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html</A>
     
  3. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Agreed, I think fixing you mechanical (and/or rerouting or insulating lines) is the best route. As far as I know (from experience, not hard evidence) the mechanical is far more dependable than the electric. In my book, the only reason to run an electric would be fuel injections where the mechanical can not maintain sufficient pressure.

    Bad Dog

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, NP205, D60/C14, 4.56
    Coming soon: 4" lift, 40" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  4. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Without trying to start an argument, I'll offer you this. My 305 had a bad lobe on the cam and was going through mechanical pumps every six months or so. Once the diaphragm got weak she would vapor lock. I was told by a very reliable source that some SBCs have this tendancy, and he suggested switching to an electric pump.

    To make a long story short, the electric pump turns 7 years old in August, and hasn't given me one lick of trouble.

    I have one little comment to add- Just because something has been used for over 100 years, doesn't mean it's better than the new stuff!!!!!!!!!!!!!!![​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    <font color=red>PHOTO ALBUM-</font color=red> <A target="_blank" HREF=http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798>http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798</A>.......<font color=blue>TRUCK & HIKING PICS</font color=blue>
     
  5. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    No arguments here. If the engine has problems and is eating mechanical units, sure, I would probably put in an electric before going to very much trouble. It would be much easier than digging all the way into the cam if there is no other reason to do so. I'm just saying that one bad mechanical fuel pump does not necessarily mean that it is time to give up and put on an electric. Just giving an opinion. I'll also agree that "that is the way it has always been done" is not necessarily a good answer but, then again, neither is “this is new so it must be better”. Without hard evidence, it just boils down to what you want and what you feel more comfortable with I guess.

    Bad Dog

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, NP205, D60/C14, 4.56
    Coming soon: 4" lift, 40" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  6. HispanicPanic

    HispanicPanic 1/2 ton status

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    OK my lines are routed in good places i use rubber hoses insted of aluminum to go to my carb and all winter i had no problems with my pump but you see today here in el paso tx it got to be 89 degrees and then it started to act up and i have replaced fuel pumps before and work fine but well you know i thought maybe an electric one would be better but after reading all your replys i guess i'll give my manual another shot thanx guys

    NOT ALL HISPANICS DRIVE LOW RIDERS :-)
     
  7. elkboy

    elkboy 1/2 ton status

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    I bought a marine electric fuel pump for a old truck I had. Never had a problem with it, used to submerge it all the time. For some reason the truck used to eat manual pumps, but I never pulled the timing cover to find out why.

    [​IMG]<font color=red> Elkboy</font color=red> [​IMG]
     
  8. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I agree, just because its been used 100 years doesn't mean its the best...look whats being used now, and its not mechanical...BUT these trucks had them for 16 years or so, and if mechanicals were the problem, GM would have changed it.

    I guess more of what I'm getting at is that the mecahnical pump that is already there is much simpler to continue using than adding an electric. And since the problem is "vapor lock" I fail to see how that has ANYTHING to do with it being a mechanical pump. Vapor lock, if my understanding is correct, is when the fuel vaporizes, and since the pump is designed for liquid, no fuel. The pump should have nothing to do with the fuel vaporizing.

    I've seen fuel pressure regulators cause this EXACT problem.

    Dorian
    My K5 and Chev/Olds tech/links page: <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html>http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html</A>
     

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